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How does Charlotte Bront create sympathy for Jane of the novel, Jane Eyre?(TM)

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Introduction

GCSE English Literature Coursework How does Charlotte Bront� create sympathy for Jane in the first two chapters of the novel, 'Jane Eyre?' We are transported back to 1842; a customary cold and dreary day is the setting of the month of November. A young girl sits alone as she's made redundant from the daily family meeting and is left to fend for herself. This is merely the beginning of a great novel that has been transformed into silent and sound film adaptations, musicals and television series. Though it was made 166 years ago and for it to still have all this interest from the media, means that it still does have something special about it In a time where women were supposed to behave in a certain manner that if opposed to would make you stick out, and when children were to be seen and not heard, it is Jane who challenges these assumptions and makes something of a stand. The use of 'I' at the beginning of the novel instantly makes us enter into the workings of Jane's mind, which helps the reader understand what Jane is feeling. This means we get a trustworthy but restricted viewpoint of Jane. ...read more.

Middle

These are backed up by the stories she had heard when she was younger and the fact that supernaturalism was a way of disciplining children. 'I thought it like one of the tiny phantoms, half fairy, half imp...' Jane tries to escape her prison-like environment through her imagination. She begins by reading a book called 'Bewick's history of British Birds'. The name already implies that it was not made for children. When the book goes on talking about 'The two ships becalmed on a torpid sea...' she forms her own version in her mind about the ships and instantly transforms it into 'marine phantoms' and the 'vast sweep of the Arctic Zone' becomes a 'death-white realm'. She continues to frighten herself and converts adjectives into thoughts based on paranormal activities and bereavement. These thoughts are probably occurring because of the bad treatment she constantly receives and all that has led to is darkness and depression. These are the kinds of things that only a really troubled person can feel i.e. Jane. In the Red-Room it feels as if the whole experience is religious and sombre. ...read more.

Conclusion

We are again spared from the details and have no knowledge of what the Red-Room is. All that we know is that Jane is being punished therefore the Red-Room isn't going to be a very nice place. Chapter 2: 'I suppose I had a species of fit: unconsciousness unclosed the scene' For the third chapter we are desperate to know if the fit has led onto anything more serious and if she is going to wake up from that state of unconsciousness. Sympathy really is what we feel for Jane in these two chapters. The fact that an innocent and powerless girl has to go through so much hurt and pain makes the reader really feel for her. Though she has a very mature mentality it does not mean that she isn't still a ten year old. The most effective ways that I think Bront� has caused us to empathize with Jane is by being let into her imagination and having a first-hand view of what she goes through and her thoughts about everything. Moreover the fact that she cannot do anything about all of it as she remains a dependant means she is a defenceless victim prone to any kind of torment and this creates a strong supporting bond with the reader. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 | Page ...read more.

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