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How does Charlotte Brontconvey Jane Eyre's state of mind in chapter 2 of the text 'Jane Eyre'?

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Introduction

How does Charlotte Bront� convey Jane Eyre's state of mind in chapter 2 of the text 'Jane Eyre'? Jane Eyre is a 13 year old girl living with her aunty and cousins. She is very left out from the family and has a strong character. Jane Eyre's state of mind in the text "Jane Eyre" written by Charlotte Bront� is delivered through the use of pathetic fallacy and imagery throughout this chapter. Jane's fiery temper changes to a relieved state of mind when her surroundings change and when she is alone. Her feelings and emotions change throughout the chapter and we are told this through Charlotte Bronte's use of repetition which is one of the main techniques used by the author Bront� writes in first person so the text sounds personal and as if Jane is telling you things from the heart showing her emotions. Using this technique makes it more direct to the reader and sound like its coming from Jane's point of view and not somebody else's, this is a useful technique because it makes the reader feel they can get into Jane's mind. ...read more.

Middle

He would come back to help her because Mrs. Reed said that she would look after Jane and treat her like one of her own but she hasn't. This makes Jane frustrated because she isn't treated as one of Mrs. Reeds own. Jane doesn't understand why she is being punished. She is being picked on by John who is trying to get her in trouble all the time. John knows he can get away with it because he is the master of the house and she was just a little girl. This can be seen when Jane says "My heart beat thick, my head grew hot; a sound filled my ears". In this extract we can see how Jane is becoming self couscous and questioning herself. She's feeling frustrated because she doesn't understand why she is always suffering such as when John got her in trouble for running out in the rain when she was just reading a book quietly. But when Jane is told that she has done wrong she fights back and rebels against class and gender differences by going against this image. ...read more.

Conclusion

Bront� uses a lot of different techniques in chapter 2 to convey Jane's feelings. Bront� uses punctuation to show commandments, anger and questioning to show Jane's tone of voice for example; "Master! How is he my master? Am I a servant?" This shows her tone of voice and the way she answers back to the maid. Bront� uses repetition to emphasize her point and to make it sound more important. She repeats what the maid says as if to mock her. Bront� uses imagery to show how Jane's surroundings affect her feelings. When she is in the red room she suddenly becomes weaker and instead of fighting back she questions herself as if she has done wrong not them. Bront� uses long sentences and semi colons so that the text flows on and is not so broken up. This technique makes the reader read it faster and makes it more intense. Bront� uses similes and personification to show Jane's childish and less mature side so we are still reminded of her age. Jane has many feelings through this chapter; she's fearful, rebellious, isolated, frustrated, angry and confused. Bront� shows us all these feelings as Jane's surroundings change. Bront� conveys Jane's feelings using a number of techniques. ...read more.

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