• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Charlotte Brontconvey Jane Eyre's state of mind in chapter 2 of the text 'Jane Eyre'?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Charlotte Bront� convey Jane Eyre's state of mind in chapter 2 of the text 'Jane Eyre'? Jane Eyre is a 13 year old girl living with her aunty and cousins. She is very left out from the family and has a strong character. Jane Eyre's state of mind in the text "Jane Eyre" written by Charlotte Bront� is delivered through the use of pathetic fallacy and imagery throughout this chapter. Jane's fiery temper changes to a relieved state of mind when her surroundings change and when she is alone. Her feelings and emotions change throughout the chapter and we are told this through Charlotte Bronte's use of repetition which is one of the main techniques used by the author Bront� writes in first person so the text sounds personal and as if Jane is telling you things from the heart showing her emotions. Using this technique makes it more direct to the reader and sound like its coming from Jane's point of view and not somebody else's, this is a useful technique because it makes the reader feel they can get into Jane's mind. ...read more.

Middle

He would come back to help her because Mrs. Reed said that she would look after Jane and treat her like one of her own but she hasn't. This makes Jane frustrated because she isn't treated as one of Mrs. Reeds own. Jane doesn't understand why she is being punished. She is being picked on by John who is trying to get her in trouble all the time. John knows he can get away with it because he is the master of the house and she was just a little girl. This can be seen when Jane says "My heart beat thick, my head grew hot; a sound filled my ears". In this extract we can see how Jane is becoming self couscous and questioning herself. She's feeling frustrated because she doesn't understand why she is always suffering such as when John got her in trouble for running out in the rain when she was just reading a book quietly. But when Jane is told that she has done wrong she fights back and rebels against class and gender differences by going against this image. ...read more.

Conclusion

Bront� uses a lot of different techniques in chapter 2 to convey Jane's feelings. Bront� uses punctuation to show commandments, anger and questioning to show Jane's tone of voice for example; "Master! How is he my master? Am I a servant?" This shows her tone of voice and the way she answers back to the maid. Bront� uses repetition to emphasize her point and to make it sound more important. She repeats what the maid says as if to mock her. Bront� uses imagery to show how Jane's surroundings affect her feelings. When she is in the red room she suddenly becomes weaker and instead of fighting back she questions herself as if she has done wrong not them. Bront� uses long sentences and semi colons so that the text flows on and is not so broken up. This technique makes the reader read it faster and makes it more intense. Bront� uses similes and personification to show Jane's childish and less mature side so we are still reminded of her age. Jane has many feelings through this chapter; she's fearful, rebellious, isolated, frustrated, angry and confused. Bront� shows us all these feelings as Jane's surroundings change. Bront� conveys Jane's feelings using a number of techniques. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Charlotte Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Charlotte Bronte essays

  1. The Real Charlotte - review

    When Charlotte uncovers the valuable information that Roddy has been stealing money from them, she proves herself to be a particularly good performer, treating Roddy as she did before. However, her unusual cheerfulness towards Francie shows that she is actually scheming towards her revenge.

  2. Jane Eyre : Textual Analysis of Chapter 26

    does, or is trying to, possess her entirely: this is more than significant considering Jane's state of mind at the start of the passage. This turn of phrase is not new to the novel: during her days with the Reeds, Jane described herself as 'possessing herself' of a book.

  1. Jane Eyre

    and jetty eyebrows, deep eyes, strong features, firm, grim mouth - all energy, decision, will - were not beautiful, according to rule; but they were more than beautiful to me.' This shows that the way Jane's sees Rochester's physical structure has developed during the development of their relationship as she

  2. Compare chapter 7 from 'Jane Eyre' with the extract from chapter 1 of 'Roll ...

    to take the humiliation she is faced with, and yet she doesn't say one word to Mr Brocklehurst to defend her self. Cassie Logan, I think that Cassie's character seems like she isn't raciest by the way she walks to school with Jeremy, 'he had walked with us as far as the cross roads in the morning.'

  1. Literary Theory Essay 2: Feminism

    In the novels of Jane Austen, for example, women are often confined, kept from the outside world, and men are careful to avoid discussing "shocking" or morally corrupt information such as Harriet Smith's illegitimacy in Emma in their presence. However, the women in such works rarely express dissatisfaction at their

  2. Jane Eyre - Was she a woman of her times?

    to accomplish the will...on the road to Thornfield I felt the messenger pigeon flying." Jane has now come to the knowledge that she belongs with Rochester, away from Morton and St John; Jane uses the simile o of a messenger pigeon because they have both done the same thing.

  1. Jane Eyre Essay

    Bertha, like a dutiful child, copied her parent in both points." Rochester is revealing to Jane all about Bertha and her family tricked him into marrying Bertha. The madness and hereditary disease Bertha suffers from fits in with the gothic tradition.

  2. Compare the presentation of Childhood in Charlotte Brontë's 'Jane Eyre' and Laurie Lee's 'Cider ...

    He shows then how plainness and simplicity and having just bearable conditions to live with will teach them how lucky they are to be in this world and to be one of God's children. He indicates that by serving God his way they will be accepted into Heaven.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work