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How does Charlotte Bronte convey the intensity of Jane’s experience in the red room?

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Introduction

Ashlie Edwards 10.2 Mrs Walford How does Charlotte Bronte convey the intensity of Jane's experience in the red room? Charlotte Bronte conveys Jane's experience of the red room as very intense, she writes in such a way, that it makes the reader identify with Jane and feel her isolation and sadness alongside her, and intense anger towards Mrs Reed. 'why was I always suffering, always browbeaten, always accused, forever condemned', Mrs Reed's spitefulness towards Jane and ignorance towards her own children's malevolent mannerisms, frustrates the reader, ght forward, narrative language to emphasise Jane's hatred and fear for himand compels them to feel involved in the novel and wanting to participate in the actions taking place. Bronte makes sure Jane's fear of Master Reed is also well recognised by the reader, as when Jane is narrating her opinions of John Reed, 'every nerve I had feared him, and every morsel of flesh on my bones shrank when he came near' she uses strai. Jane begins her story as an orphan raised by a wealthy and cultivated family; tension is created by the steady build-up of Jane's anger whilst she is being berated by her aunt. ...read more.

Middle

Jane is terrified of the red room for two main reasons, the first reason is the supernatural and ghostly legend that encases it, 'Mr Reed had been dead for 9 years, and it was in this chamber he breathed his last'. And the second reason is the d�cor furnishings, and overall appearance of the room. She feels most intimidated by the large furnishings and the colour of the room, she describes it as 'chill...silent.... solemn' and for anybody, young or old to be incarcerated in such a room would be truly terrifying. The colours described in the room, deep mahogany, stately reds; beige and other dark shades are typical of a truly regal stately chamber, but they are also characteristic of the gothic period that Bronte is writing in. Jane feels both physically and mentally overpowered in the red room, the sheer size of the space and furniture is so much bigger than her, it just makes her feel smaller than she already is. As her time in the red room draws on, her fear and anxiety levels dramatically increase, and she becomes spiritually overpowered. ...read more.

Conclusion

Although she was feeling intense anger towards Mrs reed at this time for her error of justice, she still feels obligated to obey her and feel scared of her, even in a state of mind that would allow her to physically and mentally fight back. Showing this type of behaviour indicates that she has probably been restrained by Mrs reed before. Towards the end of the red room scene, Jane's torment becomes unbearable, and seeing the phantom in the garden brings it all to a head. She physically breaks down and screams. She describes the ordeal as she was 'oppressed, suffocated, and endurance broke down' when miss abbot and Bessie come to the door, Bessie does show some compassion 'miss Eyre, are you ill?' but miss abbot, who is more like Mrs Reed reprimands Jane once again for making a noise, it is after this scalding, that Jane physically collapses and the chapter closes. Charlotte Bronte very successfully conveyed a sense of intensity all throughout the chapter. She managed to keep the reader in a state of suspense and sustained the level of action and passion right through the tale of Jane's incarceration. ...read more.

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