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How does Charlotte Bronte engage the readers' sympathies for the character of Jane Eyre in the opening chapters of the novel?

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Introduction

How does Charlotte Bronte engage the readers' sympathies for the character of Jane Eyre in the opening chapters of the novel? The novel Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Bronte, was a popular novel in the Victorian times. The story is of a Victorian childhood which is not common. The character of Jane Eyre is rebellious and sad young girl. The story tells us of her growth to maturity. This is known as a bildungsroman and was very popular in 1847 when it was first issued. In those days it was uncommon for women writers to be published. At first she did indeed write under a man's name. This novels success is due to Charlotte Bronte's talent in making people sympathise for Jane Eyre. ...read more.

Middle

She is always looked down on by the servants and her relatives. This makes the reader feel sympathy for her because no one looks after her and no one cares for her. The story is in first person narrative, but is told by an older Jane Eyre reflecting to the past. "Again I reflected: I scarcely knew what school was." This quote is when Mr. Lloyd asks her if she would like to go to school and she reflects and says she never did know what school was. Charlotte Bronte does this very well because we can imagine what Jane's life was like when she was growing up. The reflecting of Jane's past makes the story look from Jane's point of view instead of a third person point of view. ...read more.

Conclusion

There were people who showed Jane some affection. Bessie at first judged Jane in an unsympathetic way at first, but changed and began to show affection towards her. Helen Burns was another person to show affection towards Jane because she was there to help Jane in not worrying and knowing she had at least one friend. All this makes us sympathise for Jane because of the way she is judged unfairly by other people and also when she begins to know friends and people who care for her. I believe that Charlotte Bronte has been even more successful in engaging the readers' sympathy because of her talent in writing and making Jane's journey from her early life With the Reeds and when she goes to Lowood School a sad but great novel. Nigel Shek 10IW ...read more.

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