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How does charlotte Bronte evoke the readers sympathy for Jane in chapter one?

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Introduction

How does charlotte Bronte evoke the readers sympathy for Jane in chapter one? Jane Eyre is a Victorian novel written by charlotte Bronte, it was published in 1887. Bronte used the name currer bell as the author of the book due to the views of women the first half of the nineteenth century. Charlotte Bronte was born in Thornton, Yorkshire, England. Charlotte was sent with three of her sisters; Emily, Maria and Elizabeth, to the Clergy Daughters' School at Cowan Bridge in Lancashire (which she would describe as Lowood School in the novel). Its poor conditions, Charlotte maintained, permanently affected her health and physical development and hastened the deaths of her two elder sisters, Maria (born 1814) and Elizabeth (born 1815), who died of tuberculosis in May of 1826 soon after they were removed from the school. The beginning of the chapter starts very abruptly, it talks about "clouds so sombre" which represent the dark and gloomy life Jane leads .Charlotte Bronte uses many ways to make the reader empathise an example in the first paragraph is "a rain so penetrating" this is pathetic fallacy Bronte is making reference to weather and nature to describe Jane's feeling this gives the reader a more in depth view of Jane's solemn and recluse life. ...read more.

Middle

a holy place of worship, meaning that the window seat was her sacred little place, it also means enveloped which shows that she feels a sense of security and a refuge from the upsetting scene in the house. Jane begins to read a book -Bewicks history of British birds, "The solitary rocks and promontories" again link back to how she feels in the house-by herself and alone. Bronte uses psychological landscapes when the word "bleak" is used, Jane fells that her prospects are grim. "To the rock standing up alone, quite solitary churchyard" these two quotes again echo her sad and lonely existence, there are increased patterns to her life being solitary this is a way that Bronte creates empathy for Jane. In the next paragraphs we are introduced to Jane's cousin "master" John Reed, he portrayed as vile and unpleasant boy who despises Jane, he thinks he can govern over Jane, he is very patriarchal. He calls Jane various names the first one being "madam mope". When he walks into the library and cannot find Jane he calls to her sisters and says "Joan is not here: tell mama she is run out into the rain-bad animal". ...read more.

Conclusion

He bullied and punished me: not two or three times in the week, not once or twice in the day, but continually: every nerve I had feared him....." Jane is extremely scared of the domineering figure that is john. This relates back to the social attitudes of early nineteen century society towards women. Women were treated not as equals but as inferiors. They did not have the same rights as men. It was male oppression. John continues to hurl abuse at Jane and he then hits her, this is not right but Jane just takes it .he then calls Jane a rat this is a bestial metonym. When Jane finally does speak up "wicked and cruel boy....your like a murderer ...." He hits her again silencing her .this can also relate to society at that time and the male oppression, women were not aloud to speak up and if they did they would be penalised. Overall I do think this novel has a very feminist view everything that happens to Jane can be related back to the sexist society in early nineteen century Britain. Bronte creates empathy very well; she makes the reader feel extremely saddened by the unfair treatment that Jane is subjected to. ?? ?? ?? ?? Tova Amor Jane Eyre coursework ...read more.

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