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How does Charlotte Bronte use setting and weather in Jane Eyre?

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Introduction

How does Charlotte Bronte Use setting and weather In Jane Eyre? The novel Jane Eyre tells of the events in the life of a woman, endlessly searching for a home. The author - Charlotte Bronte - uses setting and weather to show plot, atmosphere and character. She also uses a range of writing techniques, including pathetic fallacy and paradoxes to describe the emotions of the characters in the story. She was influenced by gothic and other literary traditions of her time when writing Jane Eyre. Jane Eyre was unlike other female characters in novels of her time, in the sense that she is not a 'robot' or a servant of society. She is very strong willed, has a mind of her own and she has very strong morals and ideas. Storybook heroines of Charlotte Bronte's time were the strong outdoors type, but not Jane Eyre. She was strong also, but in different sense of the word. "I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons".(Pg.1) This quote demonstrates that Jane Eyre is not a typical heroine. She does not always do what is expected of her, she is her own person. Gateshead "There was no possibility of taking a walk that day... the cold winter wind had brought with it clouds so sombre, and a rain so penetrating, that further outdoor exercise was now out of the question" (pg.1). ...read more.

Middle

She is sent there by her aunt. At Lowood there is a terrible disease going around, and Jane only has one friend. Jane is a strong willed character and does a lot of soul searching and self-discovery in different settings throughout the novel. "Thus was I severed from Bessie and Gateshead; thus whirled away to unknown, and, as I then deemed, remote and mysterious regions"(Pg.38). This shows that the story is a quest or a journey into the unknown where Jane must discover about the world herself. Even though she does not belong at Gateshead, it is still her home and she felt anxious when leaving it for the first time. Bronte uses weather to express these feelings of Jane's. "The afternoon came on wet and somewhat misty: as it waned into dusk, I began to feel that we were getting very far indeed from Gateshead" Here Bronte describes Jane's journey to Lowood which to Jane feels a great distance away from Gateshead. Bronte is using setting to show that a new stage of the story is about to begin. Bronte uses negative description of weather more often than she uses than positive, this is probably because Jane Eyre goes through a lot of pain and sorrow before anything good ever happens to her, and Bronte probably wants to make this clear. "Great grey hills heaved up round the horizon: as twilight deepened, we descended a valley, dark with wood, and long after night had overclouded the prospect, I heard a wild wind rushing among the trees"(Pg.39). ...read more.

Conclusion

Here, Bronte's description of the antique garden reminds the reader of the garden of Eden - Jane and Mr. Rochester are in their own natural world which is like paradise. Bronte uses a description of the two of them in this setting to suggest how alike they are and how simple their love is. "Must I move on, Sir?" I asked, "Must I leave Thornfield"(Pg.62) Bronte's heroine, Jane, often speaks of Thornfield in the book, when she means Rochester. Thornfield is symbolic of Rochester. This is an example of Bronte using metaphoric language. ...Moor House Jane is truly at home in nature. "I touched the heath: it was dry and yet warm, with the heat of a summer day. I looked at the sky: It was pure: a kindly star twinkled just above the chasm ridge. The day fell, but with propitious softness; no breeze whispered. Nature seemed to me benign and good: I thought she loved me, outcast I was".(Pg.341). Bronte uses description to show how it "whispers" and "twinkles", healing Jane's feelings and providing a guiding light to tell her what to do next. Her short stay Outdoors represents how Jane is starting to become more independent. In conclusion, I think Charlotte Bronte uses setting and weather very effectively to help the reader in getting mental imagery throughout the story for and to help the reader get clear glimpses of the story from Jane Eyre's point of view. ...read more.

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