• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Chaucer present the Miller in The prologue to the Miller's Tale?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Chaucer present the Miller in The prologue to the Miller's Tale? Chaucer wrote a portrait of the Miller in the general prologue of the Canterbury tales. In this, the Miller is described as an extremely well built man with broad shoulders and large muscles. He has red hair, with a large beard and a wart upon his nose. Chaucer uses colour symbolism in the portrait; he compares the Miller with the colour red to portray the image that he is an aggressive man. ...read more.

Middle

"By Armes, and by blood and bones". This is the first line that the Miller says in which he is cursing. Chaucer has used this technique to make the reader have an instant dislike for the Miller and to realise immediately that he is not the nicest character out of the pilgrims. "But in Pilates, vois he gan to crie" This metaphor compares the Miller to Pontius Pilate who put Jesus to his death. This automatically makes the reader realise that the Miller really is a vulgar man if he is being compared to someone such as Pontius Pilate. ...read more.

Conclusion

"I am dronke, I knowe it by my soun;". It is also inferred that the Miller is insensitive "Bothe of a carpenter and of his wyf,". This reference to the text supports my point that the Miller is insensitive as he deliberately made the main character of his story a carpenter to get at the Reeve. This also shows us that the Miller is provocative. Chaucer also portrays the Miller as a misogynist. "Who hath no wyf, he is no cokewold," This quote shows us that the Miller is a hater or women as it is saying that if you don't have a wife you wont be betrayed. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Geoffrey Chaucer section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Geoffrey Chaucer essays

  1. How Does Chaucer Present The Miller To Become Such A Vivid And Vibrant Character

    Returning, he asks for another kiss. This time Nicholas, who had risen from the bed to urinate, sticks his bottom out of the window and farts loudly; Absolon brands him in the rear. He cries for water, awakening the carpenter, who thinks that the second flood is come at last.

  2. "What do the first 149 lines of the Merchant's prologue and Tale tell us ...

    In particular the audience learn of misogynistic perspectives which are adhered to by authority figures such as the philosopher 'Theofraste' (author of satire, Golden book of marriage). The Merchant skilfully uses rhetoric to balance his argument as he speaks of the potential joys and comforts of marriage, which are rejected

  1. The Miller's Tale: Lines 364-489

    is a sin, when in fact, if he knew the Bible, he would see that it is said by God that married couples should have sex - it is a pure thing. It also shows Nicholas to be manipulative and cruel in that he simply does not want to be second to sleep with Alison after John.

  2. Taking together the portrait of the Miller in the 'General Prologue' with the framing ...

    on the ale that was supplied at the tavern, the landlord of which being Harry Bailey. As the Miller has claimed that anything he says which is not of a moral standard should be blamed on his drunkenness, the reader can note Chaucer's use of a clever tactic as this announcement gets him off the hook.

  1. Presentation of the Miller

    This is an ongoing theme within the portrait of the Miller, as Chaucer relates to animal characteristics and description to illustrate the Miller. "...A werte, and theron stood a toft of heris, Reed as the brustles of a sowis eris;..."

  2. General Notes on Chaucer and the Prologue to the Canterbury Tales

    with a chilling description of the Plague (Boccaccio, First Day ), which provides the impetus for the journey in which the tales are told. The Preface defines an audience somewhat different from Chaucer's, as does the Conclusion, which includes a defense of broad speech and indecorous stories somewhat similar to that which Chaucer offers in the General Prologue.

  1. The General Prologue

    Their Yeoman is a skilled servant in charge of the knight's land, his dress is described in detail, but not his character. The Prioress is one of the most fully described pilgrims, and it is with her that we first notice the narrator's refusal to judge the value of what he sees.

  2. The Miller's tale - insults

    His wife, Alison, is having relations with one of the local younger men and he has no clue. He is tricked into believing that there will actually be a flood in his town and he must prepare for it.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work