• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"How does Conan Doyle create an atmosphere of danger and tension in Chapter 6 of 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'?"

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"How does Conan Doyle create an atmosphere of danger and tension in Chapter 6 of 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'?" In chapter 6 of the Hound of the Baskervilles, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle creates an atmosphere of danger and tension by mainly using powerful description, such as: "...the brown earth had become ruddy, the brick had changed to granite, and red cows grazed in well-hedged fields where the lush grasses and more luxuriant vegetation spoke of a richer, if a damper climate." This is to draw vivid imagery in the readers mind. All the description slows down the pace of the book, and helps portray a calmer, more peaceful mood. Compared to others in the book, very little dialogue is used in this chapter. In the first part of chapter 6, everyone is exchanging parting remarks. This is the only part of the chapter that is solely speech and very little description at all. The mood here is rather relaxed, more than anything else, the first couple of pages of chapter 6 are merely informative, and very few techniques are used here to set the scene. ...read more.

Middle

They describe him as; "...this fiendish man... like a wild beast, his heart full of malignancy against the whole race which had cast him out." This was the one last thing that was needed to complete the feeling of total unease on the journey, as it says the "grim suggestiveness of the barren waste, the chilling wind, and the dartling sky", meaning that all these things have sealed the tension and brought it to a head. But even so, after making some more progress on their journey, the men begin to miss the country with; "the slanting rays of a low sun turning the streams to threads of gold and glowing on the red earth" as they enter an altogether much " bleaker and wilder" part of the moor. This powerful description again really draws a picture of the moor making the reader fell like they are involved in the story themselves. Strong description helps the reader also sympathise with the characters. Their journey seems to go on a decline in terms of spirits as it says they reach a; "cup-like depression, patched with stunted oaks and firs which had been twisted and bent by the fury of years of storm." ...read more.

Conclusion

There is another excellent use of personification and of a simile when the author describes Sir Henry standing there looking at his surroundings. It says; "The light beat upon him where he stood, but long shadows trailed down the walls and hung like a black canopy above him." This makes it seem as though the black canopy is the threat of what is going to happen, ready to jump down on him, like he's not alone. Watson's last impression of the moor and the house does not differ from his first, as is said; "...a broken fringe of rocks and the long, low curve of the melancholy moor. I closed the curtain, feeling that my last impression was in keeping with the rest." This shows just how they all felt about the place that it was a depressing, dangerous place where trouble was waiting just around the corner. In conclusion, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle made chapter 6 of 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' have an atmosphere of danger and tension by using powerful description to draw the reader into the story, and to create imagery in their minds. By using little dialogue he was able to describe even the tiniest things and make them all seem relevant. It is an excellent chapter, in a superb book. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Arthur Conan Doyle section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Arthur Conan Doyle essays

  1. How does Conan Doyle create tension and suspense in chapter 14 of "The Hound ...

    cried Holmes. This speech is very melodramatic and re-enforces how significant harming a women was in the time of the Victorian. Conan Doyle, in chapter 14 of 'the Hound of the Baskervilles' uses a vast amount of melodramatic description of the hounds to create tension.

  2. Sir arthur conan doyle atmosphere in hound of the baskervilles

    As they travel through the moor they spot a man with a "dark and expressive face", dark shows an element of evil, as a dark atmosphere is often seen as a negative evil one. "Expressive face" shows the feeling that the man is in, and as it is linked with

  1. Hound Of The Baskervilles

    In chapter 6, Dr. Watson depicts the shadows within Baskerville Hall, "long shadows trailed down the walls and hung like a black canopy above him." This simile helps create the depressing and spooky atmosphere. The elongated sound of "ong" within the adjective "long" gives a depressing impression and the adjective "dark" creates a spooky image.

  2. Analyse Conan Doyle's "The Hound of the Baskervilles" exploring how the author uses the ...

    Mortimer is the only person who really provides Holmes with information of what he thought happened at the murder scene. Conan Doyle has used a different approach to the nature of the investigation because most of the information is gathered behind the scenes or events provide information.

  1. How does Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle create interest and suspense in the opening three chapters ...

    Finally there is a three-fold build up of interest and tension as Sherlock Holmes describes Sir Charles' last moments. There is also a change of tack - Sherlock Holmes argues - could it have been someone rather that something and why did he appear to run from the house and not towards it?

  2. Hound of the Baskervilles

    This section of the text portrays many features of the moor and has many underlying meanings. Firstly, there is contrast in the passage. At the start the image of the moor is that of calm, beautiful and undisturbed woodland and fields, "over the green squares of the fields and the

  1. How is tension built up in the monkeys paw, and in the telltale heart? ...

    'Steadily, steadily'. The word 'very' is often used to emphasise certain points 'a very, very little crevice'. The narrator uses these words to emphasise and show to the reader how stealthily he did something, due to the narrator wanting to emphasize his triumphs, and what he was proud of doing so well.

  2. How Is Chapter 14 Typical of the Way Arthur Conan Doyle Creates Tension and ...

    and "Perfectly sound," Holmes often talks to Watson as a master would to an apprentice: "I am afraid my dear Watson, that most of your conclusions were erroneous." It is this arrogance and feeling of superiority that gives rise to a factor of the tension in Chapter 14, where Holmes

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work