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How does Dickens create sympathy for his characters in great expectations? Focus on Pip and two other characters you have studied.

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Introduction

How does Dickens create sympathy for his characters in great expectations? Focus on Pip and two other characters you have studied. Dickens creates sympathy for his characters in his novel Great Expectations. He initially focuses on the character of Pip and introduces him in the churchyard alone. This then leads on to introducing other characters though Pips point of view as his life develops. The plot is followed and based on Pips life from when he was a young boy to when he became a gentleman. When in the churchyard, Pip is scared into stealing some food and a file for an escaped convict. Pip then takes the food and the file to the escaped convict and learns that there is another convict in the churchyard with the other. The convict is then re-captured, and he makes sure the other convict is also is captured. Pip is later invited to the house of an heiress to a brewery; she is called Miss Havisham. Miss Havisham was jilted on her wedding day, and from that day has refused to change anything, and to this day was still in her room with her wedding dress on and all the wedding equipment (cake etc.). ...read more.

Middle

Pip's experiences are described as being new and almost daunting. 'Pretty large room' and 'in it was a draped table with a guilded looking glass'. This portrays a sense of luxury, yet in that room 'sat the strangest lady' which shows that Pip was very new to Miss Havisham's lifestyle. Pip is forced to everything that Miss Havisham tells him to mainly because she feels like she is better than Pip in every way because she has money. However, the reality is pip is the one with the manners and he is very polite to Miss Havisham despite the way she treats him. Pip is constantly being discouraged and put down. He is repeatably being called 'boy', which is very impersonal and demeaning. This in effect creates sympathy for Pip as the reader may feel that no one, especially a young child, should be treat like that. Miss Havisham and Estella speak negatively towards and about Pip, which also creates sympathy for pip. Because of this pip begins to feel inadequate. This then causes pip to speak negatively of Joe. Magwich is a vague character at the beginning of the story. ...read more.

Conclusion

Therefore, if you consider the historical facts then you have to consider the difference of classes. For a modern reader you may not have a lot of sympathy for Miss Havisham because of the way she treats pip. Miss Havisham bullies Pip into saying things that otherwise he would not have said. Dickens uses highly descriptive words for Miss Havisham,' she had the appearance of having drooped, body and soul, within and without', this creates sympathy for Miss Havisham by demonstrating the bleak and unopportunist life that she has. In conclusion, Dickens creates sympathy for his characters successfully to make the novel interesting and to keep the reader involved in the story. He does this by using several dramatical devices to bring his characters 'to life'. He has tried to help the reader understand the situations of the character in order to create sympathy for them. All the characters take a role in creating sympathy for each other by the way they tend to treat each other in the novel. Again, Dickens uses a great amount of descriptions and detail to convey sympathy. This is done successfully and does create the correct contrast of sympathy while comparing the different characters. ...read more.

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