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How does Dickens creates sympathy for his characters in great expectations? Focus on Pip and one or two other characters you have studied.

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Introduction

Great Expectations How does Dickens creates sympathy for his characters in great expectations? Focus on Pip and one or two other characters you have studied. In the following essay I will be exploring how Dickens creates sympathy fro Pip and Miss Havisham. This novel is based upon Pip's life. The story opens with the narrator, Pip, who introduces himself and describes an image of himself as a boy, standing alone and crying in a churchyard near some marshes. This immediately creates sympathy to the reader. Dickens wrote most of the novel in first person who is Pip. Young Pip is staring at the gravestones of his parents, who died early after his birth so he never really a his parents 'I never saw my mother or my father', here we also learn that Pip's five younger brothers were also dead 'Five little stone lozenges each about foot and a half long of five little brothers of mine' this information makes us feel sorry for Pip, we are given a image of a young boy sitting in the marshes staring at his families graves. Pip lives with his domineering sister Mrs Joe Gargery and she is married to a blacksmith Mr Joe Gargery he was bought up by her. ...read more.

Middle

The treatment of Magwitch towards Pip I very aggressive, he uses physical force against him the way he puts on the tomb tone and bends him over and over "I pleaded in terror". It gives the idea that he is helpless and afraid. Magwitch threatens to kill him, he threatens Pip into bringing him food and a file. Failure to do this will cause the convict to hunt Pip down and eat his heart and liver. At the end of there conversation Pip says good night 'Goo-good-night, sir' I faltered this quote tells us that Pip hesitated this shows us how frightened he was witch makes us feel sorry for him. When Pip goes to visit Miss Havisham Estella humiliates him in a very rude manner he goes there to play so when he was playing cards with Estella she called him a "stupid clumsy labouring boy" she also criticises the way he looks "What coarse hands he has , what thick boots he has". Pip is a lonely character who doesn't have much to look forward to and we don't really get told that he has friends, and also by the way he is described we and the time the novel is set we don't get the idea that he doesn't have much of a education. ...read more.

Conclusion

fun in her life and so therefore has nothing to look forward to or laugh about this makes the reader feel very affectionate towards her character. Also Miss Havisham requests Pip to come back after a few days Pip starts to remind her that today was Wednesday Miss Havisham replies "There there I know nothing of the days of weeks and nothing of weeks of year" this informs us that Miss Havisham was never educated in her life and she doesn't even know the basics of learning. The treatment of Miss Havisham towards Pip is very demanding she wants him to do a lot of things "Come nearer" "Call Estella!" this is probably In conclusion, Dickens creates sympathy for his characters successfully to make the novel interesting and to keep the reader involved in the story. He does this by using several dramatical devices to bring his characters 'to life'. He has tried to help the reader understand the situations of the character in order to create sympathy for them. All the characters take a role in creating sympathy for each other by the way they tend to treat each other in the novel. Again, Dickens uses a great amount of descriptions and details to convey sympathy. This is done successfully and does create the correct contrast of sympathy while comparing the different characters. 1334 words Memoona Fiaz ...read more.

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