• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Dickens engage his readers in the opening of Great Expectations?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Dickens engage his readers in the opening of Great Expectations? In this essay I will be discussing the different features Charles Dickens uses to engage his readers in the opening of Great Expectations. I will use quotations from the novel to back up my points and explain what effects they have on the reader. All the different features and points made will relate to the essay title. I will also explain how effective the first chapter is, and how it encourages the reader to read on to the next chapter. Dickens language will create effect and will the reader to read on. Charles Dickens started writing novels at the age of twenty. ...read more.

Middle

Magwitch was described as a 'fearful man, all in coarse grey, with a great iron on his leg'. Magwitch threatened to kill Pip if he didn't give him something to eat. Pip went to his sister's house to steal food for the convict. Soon after Pip helped Magwitch, the convict was recaptured and sent to a penal colony in Australia. Pip hoped he would never have to see the convict again. This meeting, whilst being a frightening one, for Pip, obviously forms an important part of the early story, but by the end of the chapter we don't know the result of the meeting and will only find out by reading on to the next chapter. ...read more.

Conclusion

This draws you to the book and keeps your attention because it makes you want to discover other places and events. My final point is, by the end of the opening chapter all sorts of questions have been raised, with no answers given. What happened to Pips Parents and Brothers? Who is this strange man? Would Pip return the next morning? If so would the stranger hurt him? Would Pip get found out about stealing the food? I will only find the answers by reading on. Therefore I think this chapter is very successful as an opening. Danielle Fisher 11A English Course Work G.C.S.E Great Expectations ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. How does Charles Dickens engage and sustain the reader in the opening chapter of ...

    In comparison, we also see Magwitch's weakness. He doesn't think that he is scary enough so he creates someone that he thinks is scarier. Also, he is religious. Even though he appears to be evil, he is still a god fearing man.

  2. Great Expectations

    hours happy by telling him of his successful daughter and concealing from him that after he was dead he will not receive any of his money.

  1. How does Dickens create an effective opening chapter in Great expectations?

    He calls this terrible man who he has just described as coming from a grave "sir". This is both a reflection on the ways of the time period and also on how Pip himself has been brought up to behave.

  2. Character Essay of All MY Sons

    She is a kind friendly woman that all the neighbours talk to. Joe talks about her and says: "with-in five minuets you got thirty-nine strange people sitting at the table telling her their life story" (pg 24) This suggests she's warm, friendly and easy to talk to.

  1. How does Dickens engage the reader's sympathies for Pip during the first eight chapters ...

    in the churchyard a "small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it all and beginning to cry" this short statement also increases the pity we feel for Pip as we see him as small and vulnerable. In the time that Pip is talking to Magwitch we begin - if possible

  2. How does Dickens Engage the Reader in the Opening Five Chapters of Great Expectations?

    her two faced side appears when we meet Uncle Pumblechook, whom she's very friendly towards. 'Mrs Joe replied as she now replied "Oh Uncle Pun-ble-Chook! This is kind!"' She is a very nasty woman and keeps the readers attention because we want to see her get some justice for her

  1. How does Dickens create an effective opening in "Great Expectations"?

    Verbs such as "glared" and "growled" would usually relate to a monstrous animal not a fellow man, so the reader can sense the distress which would be felt by Pip when meeting this awful figure. The highest point of tension in my opinion is when Pip is physically in danger.

  2. How does Dickens capture the reader's interest in the first eight chapters of "Great ...

    As there is dual narration we get to hear it from two different perceptions of what is happening. The effect on the reader of there being dual narration is that the older voice keeps on coming through and telling us about the past and how he thinks of it now being older.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work