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How does Dickens engage his readers in the opening of Great Expectations?

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Introduction

How does Dickens engage his readers in the opening of Great Expectations? In this essay I will be discussing the different features Charles Dickens uses to engage his readers in the opening of Great Expectations. I will use quotations from the novel to back up my points and explain what effects they have on the reader. All the different features and points made will relate to the essay title. I will also explain how effective the first chapter is, and how it encourages the reader to read on to the next chapter. Dickens language will create effect and will the reader to read on. Charles Dickens started writing novels at the age of twenty. ...read more.

Middle

Magwitch was described as a 'fearful man, all in coarse grey, with a great iron on his leg'. Magwitch threatened to kill Pip if he didn't give him something to eat. Pip went to his sister's house to steal food for the convict. Soon after Pip helped Magwitch, the convict was recaptured and sent to a penal colony in Australia. Pip hoped he would never have to see the convict again. This meeting, whilst being a frightening one, for Pip, obviously forms an important part of the early story, but by the end of the chapter we don't know the result of the meeting and will only find out by reading on to the next chapter. ...read more.

Conclusion

This draws you to the book and keeps your attention because it makes you want to discover other places and events. My final point is, by the end of the opening chapter all sorts of questions have been raised, with no answers given. What happened to Pips Parents and Brothers? Who is this strange man? Would Pip return the next morning? If so would the stranger hurt him? Would Pip get found out about stealing the food? I will only find the answers by reading on. Therefore I think this chapter is very successful as an opening. Danielle Fisher 11A English Course Work G.C.S.E Great Expectations ...read more.

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