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How does Emily Bronte manipulate the structure of the narrative enhance the nature of the tragedy of Wuthering Heights?

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Introduction

Sophie Johnstone 12CO How does Emily Bronte manipulate the structure of the narrative enhance the nature of the tragedy of Wuthering Heights? The novel, Wuthering Heights, written by Emily Bronte is framed by dual narration; Lockwood and Nelly. The novel relies on these two characters, mainly Nelly to help enhance the nature of tragedy. As a reader we are introduced to Lockwood at the beginning of the novel and we soon learn that he is extremely unreliable. ...read more.

Middle

And so cannot sustain the story, although it acts to remind us that all narrational voices are partial and the story is in the past. Nelly Dean is a local and has known each generation of the Earnshaw and Linton families and therefore she is well placed to offer Lockwood a commentary upon the events she describes. Her posistion as a servant differs from that of the other servants, both in terms of the fact that she appears to move effortlessly between the two houses, meditating between their differences. ...read more.

Conclusion

Events are told as if they have been seen through a real person's eyes and so the reader can fully understand the emotions and actions of characters, "My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath.." It is through this that Bronte can create the tragedy, which she desires as she uses a character to retell a story and explain the feelings felt at the time, which draws the reader into the story and then aids them to feel the tragedy too almost like they were there as well. ...read more.

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