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How does Golding convince you that the conch is important in this novel Lord of the Flies.

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How does Golding convince you that the conch is important in this novel? There are several themes and symbols in the novel Lord of the Flies, and one of the most important ones is the conch and its democratic role. To the boys it is only a shell, but it holds values, which help keep their society together, so therefore Golding implies its importance. Ralph and Piggy find the conch at the beginning. Piggy immediately recognises it, as he has seen one like it before, on somebody's wall at home. "" Careful! You'll break it-------"" expresses how much Piggy respects and values it. Golding explicitly describes the shell with elegance. "In colour the shell was deep cream, touched here and there with fading pink. ...read more.


The conch's sound frightens small animals and holds a sense of power. When Jack and his choir come marching along the beach he presumes that the sound of the conch came from a man with a trumpet. The sound of the conch is so powerful that he thought a man made it, not a little boy. In this instance it gives Ralph an authoritative stance over the others as they all come to him when he blows it. The boys try to assert rules and order to their living system and as Ralph was appointed leader he creates a system for meetings. ""We'll have to have 'hands up' like at school." He held the conch before his face and glanced round the mouth. ...read more.


Jack is a dictator and does not rely on others or ask opinions. As the conch symbolises democracy Jack has no need or want for it, as he is autocratic. In chapter eleven Piggy and the conch both come to their fate together. Golding does this because the conch is a symbol of democracy on the island, and Piggy solely relies on democracy to survive. Golding convinces us that the conch is of importance by describing it in detail and giving it the power of free speech. It is clear that the conch symbolises democracy. The way Ralph, Piggy and Jack fight over it enhance it's meaning, where Ralph and Piggy are in favour for democracy and in favour of the conch and Jack is a dictator not in favour of it. When the conch is destroyed it symbolises the destruction of law, order and democracy. ...read more.

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