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How does Golding make this passage from the novel tense and dramatic - Lord of the flies.

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Introduction

How does Golding make this passage from the novel tense and dramatic In this passage, William Golding uses a variety of methods to make the passage tense and dramatic such as the sentence length, the chants and the atmosphere of the setting. This passage is also very significant in the way it contributes to what is to come later in the novel. The boys repeat the chant again and again: 'Kill the beast! Cut his throat! Spill his blood!' This phrase is repeated over and over again throughout the passage, creating tension and drama in it. As the chant repeats itself, you can feel a crescendo in the noise which also helps to make it tense and dramatic. ...read more.

Middle

The words 'desire' and 'urgent' show how the boys feel as if they need to kill this thing even though they subconsciously know it is Simon. Tension and Drama is also created in the passage when the 'beast' is seen by the littluns: 'The littluns screamed and blundered about, fleeing from the edge of the forest, and one of them broke the ring of biguns in his terror' Although Golding doesn't use short sentences in this quote, he divides the long sentence into shorter sentences by using commas. This creates pace as well as the monosyllabic words, 'screamed' and 'blundered'. He also creates drama by using the littluns to break the steady pulse of chanting which is quite frightening. ...read more.

Conclusion

if it is noisy and you can hear the thunder and see the lightning but at the end, just as Simon is killed, the rain starts to pour. The clouds opening is almost like a relief from the building drama and crescendo of noise from the beginning of the storm. The killing of Simon is the central point in this passage. Golding uses short exclamations and the atmosphere of the storm to create tension and drama in this passage. The killing of Simon is significant to the rest of the book because it is the first killing of human life. This makes the children, especially Jack, feel as if killing humans is fine and easy. They feel as if they can justify it and it is their descent into savagery. ...read more.

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