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How does H.G. Wells convey the experience of fear in 'The Red Room'?

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Introduction

How does H.G. Wells convey the experience of fear in 'The Red Room'? During the beginning of The Red Room, the narrator seems like he is fearless of the ghost in the room. This is shown in the first words said by the narrator, 'I can assure you that it will take a very tangible ghost to frighten me.' He says that it will take a 'tangible' ghost to frighten him, which means he thinks that he won't get scared unless the ghost is actually touchable. No ghosts are touchable, so he is saying that he is fearless. The narrator tries to back up his fearlessness, 'Eight-and-twenty years I have lived, and never a ghost have I seen as yet.' ...read more.

Middle

The narrator is being superstitious about going to the red room as he thinks that there is something in the room, which might do something to him. The narrator is starting to think that as people have been in this room before and have seen the ghost do bad things, it will happen to him as well. The reason why he is not rational is because there is no reason why a ghost should appear on the day that he stays in the red room. It could happen on any day in the year. However, I do not think that the narrator thinks in this way. The effect of the first person narrator telling the story is that it makes the reader feel that he is in the shoes of the narrator. ...read more.

Conclusion

Therefore, the mood of fear is already established during the beginning of the story. If this short story was read at night during the Victorian times when there was no electricity, it would be frightening for them to listen to. In the Victorian times the thought of ghosts used to make them very scared. Therefore, if this story was being read to them and they heard a noise in the room they would immediately think it was a ghost. The effect of the darkness would make them feel that they are actually walking through the passage, which would be a scary feeling for most. There are three characters other than the narrator in the red room and they all are in it for the same purpose. The three old pensioners are trying to prevent the narrator from going to the red room. ...read more.

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