• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Hardy use setting in "Tess Of The d'Urbervilles" in order to portray Tess' status in life?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Hardy use setting in 'Tess Of The d'Urbervilles' in order to portray Tess' status in life? Hardy's clever use of setting in order to wrap it's emphasizing meaning around Tess' present status in life in 'Tess Of The d'Urbervilles is one of the main reasons why his book became a best seller. In every phase, Hardy would somewhat use the surroundings of Tess at her present status and wind it with descriptions which reflect around Tess' feelings during her stage in life. Since, each phase is used to describe a chapter of Tess' life (where chapter in this case means a difficult or important stage in her life), Hardy decides to label each one with a different title of which is related to the present event or "setting" around Tess which surrounds the atmosphere of the situation. However, despite the fact there might have not been an extreme change in setting between the phases, the way he describes the setting within each phase or chapter is altered in order to keep up with Tess' never-ending string of tragedies or to prepare the reader for tragic, up-coming events. Although the narrator of the book may not include Tess as the main character in every phase in 'Tess of the d'Urbervilles', Hardy somewhat uses poetic description of the setting which surrounds the main situation in order to relate it to Tess' life, as mentioned before. ...read more.

Middle

Here Hardy emphasizes the innocence of the dancing girls by calling them "white figures", ironically dancing amongst an envious, green landscape. During this point of the story, Hardy had used colour instead of expressive vocabulary in order to portray the general atmosphere of the situation. He had cleverly situated this in order to refer to what he had mentioned earlier on in the book when he narrated that Tess was yet an emotional vessel "untinctured by experience" - in other words, "uncoloured by experience". However, he later comes to mention that Tess was a "white figure, stood apart by the hedge alone", from Angel's point of view. This may be emphasizing that, while the rest of the band were caught up in a temporary whirl-wind of envy, Tess was the only outstanding one, depicting a strong symbol of pride upon her. Or this could also mean that, the "white figure", which is portrayed to be Tess, may be a reference to her purity. However, as we progress on in the book, we reveal Tess' evolving troubles, thus Hardy's altering tone in his use of description of Tess' settings. In phase the second, Maiden No More, Tess has left Tantridge after Alec impregnates her - following a rape - and returns back to the Vale of Blackmoor. ...read more.

Conclusion

After the end of every phase, we notice Hardy's effort in describing Tess' setting, due to the fact that he mostly finishes off the phases with a summation or conclusive description of the setting surrounding Tess. We notice how before the end of every phase, Hardy's description of setting allows the readers to compare the description provided of the setting during the end of the phase with the description provided at the beginning of the phase. This allows readers to contrast the feelings being felt by Tess (or so it seems due to the descriptions) at the beginning and end of the phase, allowing us to observe her emotional transition. Hardy's build up of his descriptive criteria of the setting surrounding Tess provides readers with, not only the insight of Tess' feelings, but also how she views her surroundings (if we assume that the narrator's depiction of her surroundings are shared by her emotions). This allows readers to view the setting from her perspective, observing what she might be feeling during her phase in the novel. If it weren't for Hardy's poetic use of description, his readers would have found Tess' feelings and any emotional relevance to her state of mind, hardly significant. Sanyia Saidova 11G ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Tess of the d'Urbervilles section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Tess of the d'Urbervilles essays

  1. Compare the ways in which the Writers of 'The Handmaid's Tale' and 'Tess of ...

    Significantly, the word "trust" is only mentioned once in the whole novel, alluding to the value which both Nick and Offred have the courage to place upon their dangerous liaison. It is a feeling which the State cannot control. Most importantly, the Republic of Gilead can never completely control the

  2. Contrast the descriptions of Flint comb - Ash and Talbothays, showing How Hardy uses ...

    This is symbolic of Tess's own situations as she is being separated little by little from family and friends and from her childhood innocence. She now feels very lonely.

  1. Symbolism in Tess of the D'urbervilles

    He described the house, stables and the surroundings as looking like "money, like the last coin issued from the mint." Implying that the D'Urberville's have actually only recently come into money, and everything to do with their property and them is new.

  2. Explore Hardy's use of settings at Talbothays in phase the third and at Flintcomb-Ash ...

    married" he shouts at her and says that if she was to be married to any one it was to be him." So soon Tess is seduced again by Alec. Angel then comes back to England and asks Tess to get back with him Tess says no.

  1. Compare how Shakespeare and Hardy present the role of their tragic heroines within society ...

    The Capulets' aspiration for Juliet is to marry the noble County Paris (a kinsman of the Prince.) Quote. The Derbyfields, upon falling on to hard financial times, wish for Tess to go to seek their wealthy relatives in order for her to be married.

  2. Tess of the d'Urbervilles (1891) by Thomas Hardy.

    There, he finds Tess in an expensive boardinghouse called The Herons, where he tells her he has forgiven her and begs her to take him back. Tess tells him he has come too late. She was unable to resist and went back to Alec d'Urberville.

  1. Contrast the descriptions of Flintcomb Ash and Tolbothays, showing how Hardy uses the atmosphere ...

    their marks on them, "from behind the north pole...gaunt spectral creatures with tragic eyes..." with this quote Hardy is trying to show us that these birds may be lost in life just like Tess is. At this stage in Tess' life she must feel very confused as everything has changed,

  2. Examine how Hardy uses setting to explore related themes and issues.

    Hardy suggests that the weather was harsh and relentless, and beating against Tess, making it very hard for her. A further comparison is the setting of the two farms. Talbothays is portrayed as a beautiful place, in a rich agricultural region of southern England-"the valley in which milk and butter

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work