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How does Jane Austen reveal her world to the reader in the opening of 'Pride and Prejudice'

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Introduction

How does Jane Austen reveal her world to the reader in the opening of 'Pride and Prejudice'? Jane Austen was part of a respectable family with 5 brothers and a sister. She was sent to a boarding school at a young age, this is when she found out that she loved to write. She met a man called Tom Lefroy, but she could not marry him because he just didn't make enough money. Jane had a very close relationship with her sister Cassandra. The family moved to Bath and lots of Janes possetions were sold Jane did not pretend to understand the men. "he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters" Later in her life Jane had to decide if she wanted to marry for money. She chose not to, this is quite a main point in the novel as the Bennets are trying to marry their daughters off so that they can get some money. ...read more.

Middle

What a fine thing for our girls!" This is said by Mrs Bennet when she finds out about Mr Bingley moving in. She thinks that it would be a great chance for her daughters. The dances that the women attended to were probably the best way of meeting potential husbands. It says in the novel that Mrs Bennet's "business of her life was to get her daughters married". This shows the importance of marriage to Mrs Bennet, as she really wants her daughters to get married and have a good life. This is also similar to Jane Austen's experiences as Janes mother was desperate for her to marry a man who had plenty of money so that Jane did not have to worry about her future. Manners were very important as people were judged on their manners. When Mr Darcy refuses to dance with anyone, the other women find this appalling as this means that their will be a woman who will have to sit out for the dance. ...read more.

Conclusion

All of the women agree except for Jane who suggests that he is just shy. Lots of girls were sent away to boarding schools when they were young, but only if the family could afford it, Jane Austen was sent away when she was a young girl. In the novel Jane and Elizabeth's close relationship is very similar to the relationship that Jane Austen had with Cassandra her sister. Elizabeth and Jane would tell each other everything and could trust each other, just like Jane Austen and Cassandra. "When Jane and Elizabeth were alone - expressed to her sister how very much she admired him." This means that Jane and Elizabeth would share things between each other that they wouldn't tell to anyone else. They are talking about Mr Darcy, when the other people were with them everyone was saying that Mr Darcy was disgusting but once it was just Jane and Elizabeth alone they told each other how they really felt. Sean Taylor ...read more.

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