• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Jane's character differ from the other women in the novel?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Jane's character differ from the other women in the novel? Jane's temperament is strong and unique and she share's very few qualities with any of the other women in the novel. This is because, as a central character, Jane has to stand out and be individual. The other women in the novel are used to accentuate the qualities Jane has and enable comparison as well as helping to develop Jane's character. The beginning of the novel is set at Gateshead, where Jane spends the early years of her childhood. The cruelty Jane suffers at Gateshead, because of Aunt Reed and her cousin John, is what she struggles to overcome throughout the novel. Aunt Reed is a fairly simple character who only features occasionally in the novel, but whose cruelty is constantly referred to as having scared Jane. Aunt Reed is portrayed as being cruel, manipulative and "hard-hearted." She takes advantage of her power over Jane and treats her with "miserable cruelty". Jane has a more caring nature than Mrs Reed, from whom she seeks only love. Jane is not malicious like her aunt and the only qualities they share are their strong willed principles and feminist attitude towards many circumstances. ...read more.

Middle

Mrs Fairfax and Jane don't really share that many qualities. Their social class is similar and "the equality between her" and Jane "was real," but Jane is intelligent and much more of a dreamer. Mrs Fairfax is simple, "affable and kind," she is content with what she has, Jane seeks more. Mrs Fairfax also plays the condescending mother role, as Jane and Mr Rochester's feelings develop. She can be very judgemental but the fact that her views have such a significant impact on Jane, shows just how much her opinion matters and Jane does care, not just about Mrs Fairfax but also her self image. Adele provides a good comparison to Jane's childhood and shows the difference social class can have. Adele has a higher social class than Jane even though she is a child. However, despite the fact that Adele is "spoilt and indulged" and Jane was not, the two are quite similar, both are parentless and have to settle for substitute mothers. Jane had Bessie. Adele has Mrs Fairfax. This shows another similarity, as both of their substitute mothers were lower in social class than themselves. ...read more.

Conclusion

It creates sympathy for Jane because her happiness at Lowood was only very short lived and so she is forced to search for love elsewhere. At Thornfield Jane meets Mrs Fairfax and Adele, two women who she admires greatly. Again Jane's happiness and equality she feels with these women is all due to her situation. It is important that Jane likes these women because it reflects on the way her relationship will progress with Rochester. She is happy and content at Thornfield, with Mrs Fairfax, Adele and Mr Rochester, although this is again to be jeopardised with the arrival of Blanche and the discovery of Bertha. These women highlight the problems Mr Rochester and Jane face in social class, wealth and relations. Marsh End is the conclusion to the story and the women Jane meets there are both kind, caring and equal to Jane. These women prove that Jane's struggle throughout the novel was not in vain as she is rewarded with friends, family and independence. Jane's experiences at Marsh End prove that she has overcome the hardship she began her life with at Gateshead and she is finally able to marry Rochester, knowing that she has all the things she needs to be happy and contented, independence, money, family friends and equality. English Coursework 27/01/02 Jessica Roach 11A ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Charlotte Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Charlotte Bronte essays

  1. How has the character changed throughout the novel?

    Eyre of Madeira, is dead; that he has left you all his property, and that you are now rich - merely that - nothing more.". This is, of course, a great shock to Jane Eyre, as she has been working as a schoolmistress, and was reduced to begging before being fortunate enough to find that job.

  2. EXAMINE THE SIGNIFICANCE OF JANE EYRE'S RELATIONSHIP WITH HELEN BURNS

    Also, the fact that Helen is three years older than Jane does not get in the way of their friendship, which shows further strength between the relationships of the two girls We learn throughout this story the way in which Jane and Helen's opinions correspond as well as the way they differ.

  1. Trace the development of Jane Eyres' character from a passionate child to independent woman

    At first Rochester treats Jane with rudeness and abruptness. But eventually, this changes, Mr Rochester and Jane start to become good friends and Jane begins to get feelings for him. 'He had not infrequently quitted it in manner quite as abrupt and unexpected. When I heard this I was beginning to feel a strange chill experience and a sickening

  2. I will be examining three different locations used in Charlotte Bront's novel 'Jane Eyre' ...

    use when parents of future pupils came to visit the school, and they were diverted into here- almost to give the illusion that the school was a nice place to be. Not even the staff were allowed in here. If the parlour were not being used for prospective parents, it would simply be a place for Mr.

  1. Attitudes assignment- a class divided. Social Experiment in a primary school class to ...

    Jane Elliott: Is she proving that we're right? Man: Yes." Mrs. Elliot would in this fashion, degrade the blue-eyed people. No matter what the blue-eyed people said, she would find a flaw, which made her ruthlessly engage upon exaggerating it- thus putting the blues "back in their place".

  2. A comparison of a pre-twentieth century and a twentieth century novel.

    This is evident when she asks-"What exactly is a nigger lover?" She is na�ve and this causes admiration towards her. Her perspective and naivety is comic. Her na�ve outlook is that expected of a child, which is present when she narrates: "For the life of me I did not understand how he could sit there in cold blood...

  1. Places are of Great Significance in Bronte(TM)s Jane Eyre(TM).

    Gateshead, to Jane, brings back many bad memories as she finds herself with no lasting or meaningful relationships with any of the Reed family. After the death of Mr Reed, Jane's uncle, Mrs Reed had been entrusted with Jane's care and vowed to take care of her as if she was her own child, a promise that she didn't keep.

  2. Analyse the ways in which Bronte presents the "wedding" of Jane and Rochester and ...

    It is usually six months preparation minimum. Bronte presents Mr. Rochester as not someone who is a conventional hero as he was "impatient of" Jane's "delay" and "sent up to ask" why Jane wasn't coming down. In a traditional Christian wedding the bridegroom should not ask when the bride is arriving as she has the right to be "fashionably late".

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work