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How does Lady Macbeth's language in Act 1 Scene 5 and Act 5 Scene 1 reveal the change that has over come her.

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Introduction

Student Name: Isa Abdur Rahman Course Work Unit: Shakespeare Subject: English & English Literature * How does Lady Macbeth's language in Act 1 Scene 5 and Act 5 Scene 1 reveal the change that has over come her The vastness of the transformations that have besieged the character Lady Macbeth from Act 1 Scene 5 and Act 5 Scene 1 are irrefutable to even the most obstinate. These denatures occur both in her physical appearance and in her psychological make up, interfering greatly with her speech and perception. The playwright utilises the protagonist to depict the consequences of a conscience that carries a burden far greater than it can bear. Lady Macbeth's character sways from that of strength and stability, to one of weakness and instability. From a calculated murderess, to a hallucinating lunatic. In Act 1 Scene 5, the commencing lines of her initial soliloquy not only echo in rhythm to the 'witches' omen, but are proclaimed with great conviction of her belief in these predictions. Her personal additions to the quotations of the 'weird sisters' are ample evidence of her burning ambition: 'Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be/ what thou art promis'd'. ...read more.

Middle

It is her invitation that summons the spirits 'that tend on her mortal thought', to reform them to the actions of the immortal. And it is her, that order Macbeth, into actions he was incapable of, he was morally barred from, for the night's ' great business was in' her ' dispatch'. And in end, she proclaims the prizes that awaits, should they enact such a plan. A prize 'which shall give to all our nights and days to come, give solely sovereign sway and masterdom'. In Act 5 Scene 1, the conduct, language and psyche of Lady Macbeth have suffered great set backs and have been denatured in an irrecoverable manner. The immensity of these reformations enable them to be a certainty, with great rampancy, in the scene. The eloquence and prosperity in her speech have departed from her, her conversations are in prose, and no longer bear the mark of a great lady. The complex and poetic fashion in which she discourses, is replaced, by phrases that are mono-syllabic, ' yet here's a spot'. Furthermore, the variety and diversity in her diction and her uses of sophisticated grammar have strayed from her, and have been exchanged with the language of a child. ...read more.

Conclusion

The playwright exploits Lady Macbeths language to illustrate to the reader the transformations in her behaviour, and with great success, creates a character that suffers from a conscience that carries a burden far greater than it can bear. His employment of numerous methods, such as the soliloquy's, imperatives and strategic, almost poetic discourse of Lady Macbeth in contrast to such childish, monosyllabic and incompetent speech in later scenes assure such stark results. Further more, by entangling forces of the unknown into the play, Shakespeare adds an extent of exorcism and allows way for the possibility of possession, for in such a case, her voice would merely be a means of out put for the possessing spirit, thus satisfying the reason for such alteration. Her beckoning for the spirits to 'unsex' her, and to grant her the strength and stability of man had, without doubt, been unheard, for in end her sensitivity and weakness, all of which are characteristics of the feminine group had consequated her insanity, for she remained a lady. Her load had been one of great immensity, and exceeded her capacity and thus it crumbled upon her. Lady Macbeths language in Act 1 Scene 5, and Act 5 scene 1 explicitly reveal the enormity of the alterations that have plagued her, thus adding further peril to this dark tale. ...read more.

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