• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How Does Lawrence make clear to the Reader the Difficulties in the Relationship Between Men and Women?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

'Tickets, Please' (You may refer to 'Odour of Chrysanthemums' as well if you wish) How Does Lawrence make clear to the Reader the Difficulties in the Relationship Between Men and Women? A large factor contributing to the difficulties between the sexes in Lawrence's tow stories is lack of understanding between the sexes - Annie does not understand John Thomas' need to remain a nocturnal 'presence', his desire to remain free; his reputation; or why he should choose her at the end. At the fairground, and even before this event, Annie seems to think she knows John well, that she can easily anticipate his actions and knows what sort of man he is - 'she could sum him up pretty well'. All her expectations are confounded at the end; she is taken completely by surprise at his choice of girl. Elizabeth in 'Odour of Chrysanthemums' thinks her husband is simply out at the pub again, she has developed low expectations for him, but at the same time she fears that something worse has happened 'her anger was tinged with fear', though she tries to convince herself otherwise by assuming he's just drunk. ...read more.

Middle

John Thomas does not understand what is happening initially at the end - he doesn't realize that he has caused the girls to feel the way they do, because he expects them all to understand the short-term nature of a relationship with him. Annie has behaved so independently around others previously, as such a carefree wild spirit, that John Thomas cannot be solely blamed for not expecting her to feel so deeply and hunger for greater involvement. He is taken completely by surprise by the vicious attack made against him 'his blue eyes flamed with strange fear as well as fury', 'they were rather horrifying to him'. This is not the typical conduct of a group of young women, and it leaves him rather dumbfounded 'a strange, ragged, dazed creature'. Annie herself does not even really expect the course of events to follow the path it does, she does not plan for things to be taken as far as they are. It is the women that have the power at the end of both stories; the men, normally most dominant, have lost all control and shredded their masculinity. ...read more.

Conclusion

Annie and John Thomas both think that they understand each other, that they know the chances they take, yet Annie is taken completely by surprise when he leaves her, and he certainly does not expect the almost savage attack on him at the end. The men in both stories are neglectful of the duties expected of them - John Thomas moves quickly from one girl to the next, breaking hearts in the process; in 'Odour of Chrysanthemums' the man has obviously made a habit of spending all his time and money in a pub on alcohol rather than being attentive to his wife and children. Both the main women feel shame - Annie for her actions, for the humiliation she has inflicted upon John Thomas - particularly at the end of the story, from the moment John Thomas chooses her onwards. Elizabeth feels shame for the shadow of a life she shared with her husband, Walter, for how little she felt she knew him as she washed his dead body, and for having her low expectations of him, almost hating him. ?? ?? ?? ?? Jenny Rowan 11M 7 March, 2001 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE DH Lawrence section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE DH Lawrence essays

  1. D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence (1885-1930)

    Jack Cardiff, starring Dean Stockwell, Trevor Howard, Wendy Hiller, Mary Ure * LOVE POEMS AND OTHERS, 1913 * THE PRUSSIAN OFFICER AND OTHER STORIES, 1914 * THE RAINBOW, 1915 - film 1989, dir.

  2. Critical appraisal of DH Lawrence's short story, 'Odour of Chrysanthemums', making use of stylistic ...

    This familiarity links in with the last category of Cohesion and context. Lawrence is clearly from the context of his piece and shows he knows his surroundings by the excessive use of the definitive article. ('The' small locomotive...) Also the detail of his commentary, for example down the very number of the engine (Number 4)

  1. What aspects of the short story tradition are exemplified in "Odour of Chrysanthemums"?

    Although they are not really short stories, this is a technique frequently employed to great effect by Terry Pratchett in his popular novels, which are written in a short story-like style. In Odour of Chrysanthemums it is almost used: the reader's expectations are built up that Mr.

  2. Why Is the Story called Fanny and Annie?

    this is all done to build up the moment on the unsuspecting reader. The author does this to make the reader feel the same sense of disbelief about the accusation as the rest of the congregation did, "Fanny, startled like the rest."

  1. D.H. Lawrence's "The Odour of Chrysanthemums" - review

    Lawrence portrays the social factors he knew so well. The butty's wife rushing to gossip with her neighbour, the man's deference to the other man's wife. The miner's mother arrives, increasing the sense of doom. Waiting, the wife's thoughts are for her family, the mother's for the lad her son had been.

  2. Compare how nature is used/conveyed in 'A Snowy Day in School' and 'Schoolroom on ...

    H. Lawrence frequently uses nature to tell us his ideas and interpretations of his students. He compares them to flowers in particular, as they can blossom or shrivel up, like a young child's mind can. In the first line of 'A Snowy Day in School' Lawrence already indicates the

  1. David Herbert Lawrence - review of The Rainbow

    However, her relationship with Winifred also fails her; while Ursula is initially attracted to Winifred's refined habits, and sees her mannerisms as a sign of an exalted soul, Ursula's further investigation leads her to the realization that she was misled by appearances.

  2. "Examine DH Lawrence's 'Mountain Lion' and 'Snake', showing how the poet a) uses language ...

    All people would have the same approach towards snakes and Lawrence is not afraid to admit his true feelings. "And voices in me said, If you were a man You would take a stick and break him now, and finish him off."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work