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How does Miller capture and maintain the audience's interest in The Crucible?

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Introduction

The Crucible Assignment: How does Miller capture and maintain the audience's interest in The Crucible? There are many ways in which Arthur Miller Captures and maintains the audience's interest in his 20th Century play, The Crucible. Right from the start of the play Arthur Miller uses Dramatic devices such as curiosity to capture the audience's interest. He maintains the audience's interest right throughout the text by using themes, which are still relevant today. He also uses the storyline to maintain the audience's interest. Arthur Miller uses the language in a very attention-grabbing way, as I have found that his description/portrayal of characters and when he directly addresses the audience also helps to maintain the audience's interest. Arthur Miller wrote 'The Crucible' because he felt that McCarthyism, (the hunting down of communists in his time) was wrong, just like the witch-hunt trails in Salem in 1692. The play is based on the Salem witch trails but it links the ideas how McCarthy was unjust to communists because McCarthyists thought that foreigners were communists and the people of old Salem believed that people of a noon-Christian upbringing practised witchcraft. They thought that these people worshiped the devil and imprisoned or killed. I think that Miller used the Salem witch trails as a parable to write about McCarthyism in his present time in 1950-54. He felt that McCarthyism was unjust and did not give foreigners or communists a chance. During this period people accused others of being others of being communists to get out of trouble themselves, this is also mirrored in the play. ...read more.

Middle

Desperate to reveal the truth and save his wife, whose honesty he praises, Proctor admits his adulterous relationship with Abigail. The court officials do not tell Elizabeth what her husband has said and ask her to confirm he is a 'lecher.' Loyal to Proctor and determined not to sully his good name, she denies that he is a lecher, thus condemning both of them. At this point, the audience sympathises completely with the Proctor's. Their love and self-sacrifice gives them warmth and humanity. Their fate is inevitable and we feel anger at the injustice and their suffering. Even after the text has finished, the audience is still engaged and we still want to know what will happen. The way the story is revealed also keeps our interest. At the end of each act, Miller leaves the play in a state of climax. At the end of act, one Miller draws the curtain on the girl's firing frenzied and false accusations of witchcraft against many women in Salem, act three ends with the dramatic exit of Mr Hale "I denounce these proceedings, I quit this court!" Through this approach it always keeps the audience on the edge of their seats. Leaving the audience with a climax at the end of each act allows the audience to toy with their emotions and the ones portrayed in the play. It is also interesting to see how different relationships develop as the plot unfolds. For example, the relationship between John and Elizabeth Proctor goes through almost unrecognisable changes. ...read more.

Conclusion

The roof rafters are exposed, and the wood colours are raw and unmellowed." This description tells us the room is empty and has no felling and it is cold. Again, the reader gets the warning that something bad it happening. Miller gives the impression that something has been through the room. The rafter are exposed and the colours are raw harsh. As we can see that even though the play has not started, the audience is already starting to get involved in the text. Before the play starts Miller says "Betty Parris, aged ten, is lying on the bed, inert" and he says that Parris is discovered "Praying" Instantly the audience is curious, why is this child inert/motionless? Why is Parris praying? At this point, the play begins, we can see that Miller already had captured the audience's attention before anything starts and this is what he does at the start of every act. This further helps to increase the effectiveness of Miller's Play. I think that Miller succeeds in engaging the audience throughout the play. This is because The Crucible contains dramatic devices that keep the audience hooked to the play. Miller also used preoccupation that are still relevant and that will still be relevant and engaging in the future. Miller uses a range of dramatic devices in The Crucible that combine to engage the audience. These include the shocking events in the storyline, his fascinating portrayal of characters, especially Jon Proctor and his effective use of language. We watch in horror as events unfold and we admire proctor's integrity and accept the warning that such witch hunts happened and can still happen today. By Ramnik Singh Sall ...read more.

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