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How does Miller create dramatic tension between John, Elizabeth and Abigail in Act 1, Scene 3 (pages 17-19) and Act 2 Scene 1 (pages 41-46).

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Introduction

How does Miller create dramatic tension between John, Elizabeth and Abigail in Act 1, Scene 3 (pages 17-19) and Act 2 Scene 1 (pages 41-46) Tension is the most important thing in plays, films, books and all other types of entertainment. Dramatic tension can be established by conflict between characters and twists in the plot. It can be built up further by more of the plot unfolding, body language and movement of the characters. The strong religious society of Salem does not allow fun, games or even dances and colourful dresses. A seventeenth century puritan's life would of consisted of working and praying, this strong society may of caused characters to act the way they did. Salem, as a puritan society, has many strict laws and anyone who broke these laws must be punished but, unlike modern Christianity, the sinners cannot be forgiven and therefore must live in shame throughout the rest of their lives. The most hideous crime in Salem was to compact with the devil and commit witchcraft. ...read more.

Middle

This confirms Proctors strength to continue to refuse Abigail. The strong religious society of Salem do not approve of forgiveness of sins therefore Proctor must wrestle with his guilt throughout the play. This furthermore builds dramatic tension as Proctor, instead of looking for forgiveness, shows the strengths and will power of a good Christian man. "I never give you hope to wait" 'never', is such a strong word so this shows that Proctor is being extremely firm and decisive, he knows he can't continue the affair so looks to repent his sins by pleasing his wife. This builds dramatic tension as Proctor tries hard to please her but cannot fulfil her as seen in Act 2, Scene 1. As Proctor keeps calm Abigail is forced to use different emotions and approaches to convince Proctor to continue the affair. As Proctor evades the approaches Abigail resorts to crying and eventually anger, Miller shows this in the stage directions and all of these outburst create more dramatic tension. "(with a flash of anger) ...read more.

Conclusion

Miller created his own form of language so people could understand the strict society the puritans had to live in. If he had not a lot of dramatic tension would have been lost, for example when characters are angry they often dropped 'g' from ends of words. "Spare me! You forget nothin' and forgive nothin'," Proctor, who says the above quote, is obviously angry so Miller purposely drops the 'g' to try and make the audience feel as they are part of the Salem so they understand the immense pressure and expectation pushed upon them. This creates an enormous amount of dramatic tension and without this style of speech the play would of lost a considerable amount of dramatic tension and would not of been seen as such a masterpiece. Miller uses a range of techniques to create dramatic tension between John, Abigail and Elizabeth such as staging, language and conflict. Without these techniques the play would of lost effect and the audience interest. ...read more.

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