• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Mishima hint through moving between visions of perfection and movements of doubt and despair, that the outcome of the novel will not be a happy one?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Mishima hint through moving between visions of perfection and movements of doubt and despair, that the outcome of the novel will not be a happy one? In this essay I will try to explain how Mishima is hinting through moving between visions of perfection and movements of doubt and despair, that the outcome of the novel will not be happy one. All three main characters of the novel have ideas of their ideal world which as the novel continues are progressively destroyed. In the novel Mishima describes the life of Noboru a teenager who's not happy with the society he is living in, and how his ideal world soon is destroyed as the man who his mother Fusako met, is no longer the man he appears to be. Noboru is a young teenager who thinks life consists of a view signals and decisions and that once your born you only ...read more.

Middle

Having broken the circle Ryuji could be in danger as Noboru would be capable to do anything as long as his ideal world is not destroyed "If this is ever destroyed, it'll mean the end of the world...I guess I'd do anything to stop that, no matter how awful!" Another way to proof that the outcome will not be a happy one is that even though Ryuji is certain that that he's only destined for glory "At twenty, he had been passionately certain: there's just one thing I'm destined for and that's glory; that's right glory!" and that there is something special in store for him, "there must be a special destiny in store for me; a glittering, special-order kind no ordinary man would be permitted". He still thinks that once he finds the love of his life death will come in between "a man encounters the perfect woman only once in a ...read more.

Conclusion

Now the kitten was dead Noboru felt like "Death had transfigured the kitten into a perfect, autonomous world". In conclusion I think that Mishima has been hinting from the beginning of the novel that the end of the story will not result to be a happy one, as its clearly shown that even though Noboru has his visions of perfection and believes in his own ideal world, a lot of events show us that he is determined to stand up for what he believes, as he now finally proofed his manhood and could do anything to stop whatever stands in his way "I can do anything, no matter how awful.". Even though it is not clear in the beginning Mishima has made it clear to us that the chance is big for the outcome of the book not to be a happy one. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Love Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work