• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

HOW DOES PLATH CONVEY THE CONTRAST BETWEEN THE NARRATORS VIEW OF THE WORLD AT THE BEGINNING OF THE STORY AND HER VIEW AT THE END?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

HOW DOES PLATH CONVEY THE CONTRAST BETWEEN THE NARRATORS VIEW OF THE WORLD AT THE BEGINNING OF THE STORY AND HER VIEW AT THE END? In this essay I will be talking about how Plath conveys the contrast of the narrators view at the beginning and at the end of the story. I will be talking about how Plath depicts colour, light, similes, metaphors and characters in the story. One contrast that Plath uses is colour. Colour changes throughout the story. In the beginning the colours are all bright, like the part where it says "the changing colours of those days, clear and definite as patterns seen through a kaleidoscope." The colours in a kaleidoscope are all bright colours such as red and yellow. This is how the narrator feels. ...read more.

Middle

It also suggests that the narrator's life is quite imaginary. This is because Dali is a surrealist artist and he does imaginary drawings. Another technique used by Plath is metaphors. An example of metaphors is "the airport was my Mecca, my Jerusalem." This shows that she loves the airport as if it was a religious or very special place to her. This point also suggests that she has mind of small child, which is very make believe, and imaginary. This metaphor is good because it makes the reader feel happy and in a good mood. However near the end of the story the metaphors start to get darker. An example of this is "black shadow creeping up the underside of the world like a flood tide." This metaphor makes the darkness as though it is like a massive wave swallowing up the earth spreading darkness and misery all over the world. ...read more.

Conclusion

However near the end, when Paula falls over and ruins her snowsuit, she blames the narrator for it. When the narrator goes home and tells uncle frank, that she never tripped Paula up, he doesn't believe her. This changes the mood quite considerably because one-second uncle frank is comforting her but the next second he doesn't believe what the narrator is saying. An example of this is "you don't have to be afraid. We will understand. Only tell me what really happened." Overall Plath conveys the contrast between the narrator's view of the world at the beginning and at the end really well. This is mostly, I believe, because of the difference in colour and the difference in metaphors. The colours are bright and colourful in the beginning whereas in the end they are dark. This is how Plath conveys the difference in the beginning and in the end the best. BY TALHA RAJA. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sylvia Plath section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sylvia Plath essays

  1. Discuss the presentation of death within Plath's poetry, commenting upon how your view compares ...

    Also, the line "Nor am I the beauty of a garden bed" shows that the speaker desires that beauty; she is not beautiful enough in life. I think the line "Thoughts gone dim" signifies more literally the moment of death of the speaker.

  2. "Discuss the usefulness and limitations of employing metaphors as a means of analysing organisations. ...

    A look at the terms used in the concept of flux and transformation metaphor may make us consider the large multinational corporations which constantly adapt to a changing market or launch in a new area and where a decision made in one division of the company will have an effect on another division.

  1. Moments of change in the modern short story and how they are expressed.

    The second short story is in effect, quite similar to the previous one in the sense that it is also related to childhood; it is called Snowdrops, which is written by Leslie Norris. Leslie Norris is a Welsh poet and a short story writer.

  2. "Growing Up" the main character experiences something that changes his view of things. Compare ...

    she regards her house as a safe place where she is protected. "a secure web of light,...indestructible brilliance" again this reinforces the idea of her home being significant to her and that she feels nobody can destroy that family security.

  1. Compare and contrast three short stories from the anthology

    The mother is also very attached to the shoes like the grandfather is with the pigeon in Flight, as she holds and puts 'them under the duvet...keeping an eye on them'. This shows that she is missing her daughter and maybe her relationship wasn't too good with her daughter.

  2. What happens in the story? Superman and Paula Brown's New Snowsuit is a short ...

    Even David, who has appeared as the narrator's friend, is ready to confirm the "official" version of events. The grown ups are ready to believe this, as only the narrator denies it. Uncle Frank appears to be the only person who believes her, but even he feels he must satisfy the other grown-ups by paying for a new snowsuit.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work