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how does Robert Louis Stevenson Create a sense of Mystery, Horror and Suspense In the first two chapters of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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Introduction

how does Robert Louis Stevenson Create a sense of Mystery, Horror and Suspense In the first two chapters of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde In the novella "The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" Robert Louise Stevenson uses many techniques to create a sense of mystery, horror and suspense. In this essay I will be analyzing some of these techniques in further depth. I will be explaining what effect these techniques will have on the reader. "The strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" was published in 1886 and is probably the best known of Stevenson's novels. It concerns the fine divide between good and evil. In the book the reader finds out more about how and why Dr Jekyll created a potion that separates the good side from the evil side, of the person. Unfortunately he lost control of the situation, resulting in a number of unfortunate events. Mr. Utterson is widely regarded as a good man, there is much evidence in "The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" to back this statement up. One piece of evidence to show this is when the reader is told "something eminently human beaconed from his eyes". This is a short and meaningful insight into the persona of Mr. ...read more.

Middle

Hyde's persona. The way in which Mr. Enfield reacts to the sight of Mr. Hyde makes the reader believe he must be a truly terrible man to provoke such a reaction from a well respected man such as Mr. Enfield. Mr. Enfield Says that Hyde "gave me one look, so ugly that it brought the sweat on me like running", The reader will immediately relate someone being hideously ugly to them being morally objectionable. He also says "I had taken a loathing to the man at first sight" the reader questions what could it be that causes him to beacon this loathsome aura. It is said by Enfield that it was not only him to feel this way towards Hyde "I saw that sawbones turn sick and white with the desire to kill him" the reader wonders what could possible cause a man you whom had previously been described as emotionless to feel this way to a man he does not even know. The final account of Hyde is short but is nonetheless important it is when Hyde is described as being "really like Satan". This is a grave accusation to make, saying that a man is like Satan the epitome of all that is evil. It is not false though Hyde is all that is evil within Dr. ...read more.

Conclusion

Jekyll, but does not even know the man who he wishes to leave his entire estate to. We are told that Mr. Enfield's "imagination also was engaged, or rather enslaved; as he lay and tossed in the gross darkness of the night". Stevenson tells the reader that Utterson is imagining all of the terrible things that this Hyde character could have done. This automatically makes the reader imagine which builds up a sense of horror in the readers mind. We are told that Utterson did not know what Hyde looked like. Like Mr. Utterson the reader will imagine the worst of what Mr. Hyde looks like. He is described as a "human Juggernaut" the word Juggernaut instills images of an untamed beast that you must be cautious around. "It was the face of a man who was without bowels of mercy" This makes the reader tense about how terrible this man could be. "Spirit of enduring hatred" it could be because of the way Enfield reacted to this man that has caused Utterson to feel this way. When Utterson finally meets Hyde it is a very Dramatic tense scene full of typical language from gothic writings of that era e.g. "it was a fine dry night, frost in the air, the streets as clean as a ball room" this is typical extremely descriptive scene setting. From previous descriptions of Mr. Hyde the reader can only expect the worse for Mr. Utterson. ...read more.

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