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How does Seamus Heaney use words to capture early sensations, such as sound, smell, touch and sight?

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Introduction

James Davies English-Seamus Heaney 25th June 2001 9VP How does Seamus Heaney use words to capture early sensations, such as sound, smell, touch and sight? Seamus Heaney the Irish poet and writer (1939- ) uses a wide variety of words and phrases in his poems to introduce to you his early sensations. Heaney portrays through a number of his poems including 'Storm on the Island' and 'The Early Purges' early sensations through describing senses such as sound, smell, touch and sight. Heaney chooses his words very carefully and effectively which make his words appeal to the senses, thus creating in the mind of the reader a mental picture true to the poet's intention. ...read more.

Middle

By Heaney using similes in his poems this helps to capture some of his early sensations, in particular sound and sight. Similes also help to create better imagery in forming a mental picture in the mind of the reader, which make the poem more enjoyable, effective and pleasurable to read. An example of a simile being used in 'The Early Purges' is here, 'Like wet gloves they bobbed and shone.' That quote is when a young Seamus Heaney is watching some animals on the farm being purged by Dan and, as I mentioned in the sentence before, it helps to produce a more graphic picture in the mind of the reader what Heaney is witnessing. ...read more.

Conclusion

Here the reader would usually associate bombardment with war, but Heaney uses it to convey how vulnerable he feels through being isolated. This also shows how carefully Seamus Heaney chooses his words for maximum effect in his poem. The last way Seamus Heaney uses words to capture early sensations is through the use of onomatopoeias. Onomatopoeia is when words are used that imitate the sound of what is being described. Heaney uses these styles of words in both poems, 'Storm on the Island' and 'The Early Purges' to capture one particular sensation, sound. Examples out of those two poems of onomatopoeias are; 'Pummels, Soused and Sluiced'. Overall Seamus Heaney uses careful choice of words, personification, similes, onomatopoeias and a contrast of vocabulary to capture early sensations, such as sound, smell, touch and sight in two of his poems, 'Storm on the Island' and 'The Early Purges'. ...read more.

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