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How does Shakespeare dramatically present the importance of Act3 scene1 in which Tybalt kills Mercutio and Romeo kills Tybalt?

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Introduction

Romeo And Juliet English course work. How does Shakespeare dramatically present the importance of Act3 scene1 in which Tybalt kills Mercutio and Romeo kills Tybalt? Shakespeare made the previous scene (Act2 Scene6) a happy and joyful scene in which Friar Lawrence marries Romeo and Juliet. However, within this scene there are some warnings of something bad happening such as when Friar Lawrence says to them "these violent delights come to violent ends". He is saying everything should be taken in moderation including love or else something bad will almost certainly happen. One of the first things said in the scene by Benvolio is "if we meet we shall not scape a brawl". He is playing his normal role as peacekeeper trying to convince Mercutio to return home and prevent the possible fight. ...read more.

Middle

When Tybalt and Mercutio start speaking Tybalt is obviously looking for a fight so the audience would be starting to worry about the two brawling in the street and for the prince to have them killed. The reason Tybalt came out in to the streets was to look for Romeo. This is because he was angry about Romeo gate crashing the banquet. If we look back Tybalt said to his uncle, "This intrusion shall, now seeming sweet, convert to bitt'rest gall." ("Bitt'rest gall" Meaning poison) This shows that Tybalt will do as he is told now, but will not forget. Shakespeare is also using this as a hint to what is going to happen at the end of the play. When Romeo does not take Tybalt up on his challenge (which would have been uncommon for a man in the 1700's) ...read more.

Conclusion

Mercutio sustains an accidental injury. When this happens the friars' plan of uniting the families is completely useless whatever. Once Romeo discovers this he suddenly changes from peacemaker to war fighter. Romeo is powerless in the face of disaster; he knows what is right and wrong but he is compelled to revenge Mercutio. He reacts too quickly to the ever-changing situation without considering the consequences of his actions. I think after looking at this scene that Shakespeare's most manipulative strategy of changing our feelings has got to be the contrast in tension. He has changed our feeling so many times in this scene and I believe it is all due to the sharp contrast between one line and the next, before Tybalt and Mercutio started fighting everything had been going so well for Romeo, then suddenly he is facing what should have been a death sentence, but what is luckily later revealed as only a banishment. ...read more.

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