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How does Shakespeare link language and imagery to build tension towards an explosion of violence in which results in the death of Tybalt?

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Introduction

How does Shakespeare link language and imagery to build tension towards an explosion of violence in which results in the death of Tybalt? Imagery plays a key part in Shakespeare's plays because the audience had to create a mental image of what is happening through the emotionally charged language and provides an insight into a character's mind, "hot days, is the "mad blood stirring" ", in which nature describes how it is hot and the tension is rising, with short tempers in the opening lines of act three scene one. These appear, usually, as similes or metaphors, "hot a Jack". Shakespeare uses blank verse, which is plain text but it has rhythm, yet no rhyming words or couplets. He also tends to write in "Ianbicpentameter", with five stressed and unstressed syllables, "a plague on both your houses, I am sped". ...read more.

Middle

Montagues/Life vs. Death). Different methods of language is included in act three scene one to maintain tension in the build up to fight between Romeo and Tybalt, such as alliteration, "fire-eyed fury" and many pun's, "you shall find me a grave man.", meaning that Mercutio is serious and he will be buried in a grave or "worms' meat of me". The word "plague" upsets Romeo, forcing tension upwards as he builds up hate for Tybalt. As Mercutio dies, he ends his lines in a rhyming couplet, "doth depend, must end", which indicates the end of a sequence, his death. This mark of a Shakespeare play would be instantly recognised by Elizabethan audiences, as well as the puns and biblical references because Christianity was the only religion practiced during the sixteenth century, "nor as wide as a church door", for which a coffin will fit through. ...read more.

Conclusion

Tybalt himself only has thirty-six lines in the play, yet fourteen of those lines appear in act three scene one, some spoken with an aggressive and violent intention in his words, "Boy, shall not excuse the injuries", "wretched boy, shalt with him hence", heightening the dramatic tension to its peak as a long awaited duel is about to unfold. Other imagery such as oxymorons, combining two opposites emphasising the tension that is in act three scene one, "how nice the quarrel was", giving a startling, unusual effect the way of listing things is Shakespeare quality, when Benvolio regurgitates the recent events, also known by the Elizabethan audience. Tybalt's death is quick but the tension remains as the Prince arrives. The poetic style of writing (rhyming couplets) in the Prince's speech is more direct and emphasises the seriousness of the matter. Dramatic tension is still high as Romeo has been "exiled" from Verona. By James Lung 11KA ...read more.

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