• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Shakespeare make Act 2 Scene 5 of 'Twelfth Night' Dramatic?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Shakespeare make Act 2 Scene 5 of 'Twelfth Night' Dramatic? Act 2 Scene 5 of 'Twelfth Night' by William Shakespeare is the scene in which Maria, Sir Toby, Sir Andrew and Fabian lay the foundation of their revenge by leaving a letter for Malvolio supposedly written by Olivia saying that she loves him. The scene is made dramatic in various ways. First of all, prior to Act 2 Scene 5, the audience already dislike Malvolio. This is because he feels he can talk down to Sir Toby who is socially his superior: "my masters are you mad? Or what are you? Have you no wit, manners, nor honesty, but to gable like tinkers at this time of night?" This makes the audience dislike Malvolio because he thinks he has more right to have control over Sir Toby. We know that Sir Toby does not like Malvolio speaking down to him because he gets angry and reminds Malvolio of his position: "out o' tune Sir, ye lie, art any more than a steward?" ...read more.

Middle

Malvolio is at the front of the stage, thinking he is alone, but secretly Sir Toby, Sir Andrew and Fabian are hiding behind a bush in the garden. This adds to the tension because the audience know the other characters are there and can hear everything. Malvolio starts to pretend to order Toby around: "you must amend your drunkenness." This makes Sir Toby angry and he starts to speak out loud: "shall this fellow live?" This builds suspense as the audience wonder if he is going to blow his cover and spoil the plot. As he gets more angry he speaks louder and louder and the audience get more and more tense as they wonder what will happen. This keeps them interested and involved. Further more, dramatic Irony also contributes to the drama of Act 2 Scene 5 because the audience know that Malvolio is being tricked and therefore feel they are part of the plot to humiliate him. They enjoy watching this happen because they dislike him and so enjoy watching him build up false hope when really none of what he believes is true. ...read more.

Conclusion

Finally, Maria's final speech at the end of the scene adds to the drama because it sums up the whole scene and reminds us of what is going to happen next. "He will come to her in yellow stockings, and 'tis a colour she abhors." She is talking to Sir Toby, Sir Andrew, Fabian and the audience. This involves the audience in the plot once again and leaves them in suspense waiting for the revenge on Malvolio. She says: "if you will see it follow me." She is inviting the audience to watch the rest of the play and involving them in the plot. Sir Toby then ends the scene by saying: "To the gates of tartar, thou most excellent devil of wit." He is urging the play on and filling the audience with excitement and anticipation. Therefore, in conclusion, it is clear that Shakespeare has successfully made this a dramatic scene. His use of stage directions, dramatic irony, language and imagery has created a build up of tension by revealing Malvolio's true character, involving the audience in the plot and making them look forward in anticipation to the rest of the play. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Twelfth Night section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Twelfth Night essays

  1. Act 2 scene 5 Twelth night - What dramatic devices ensure that this scene ...

    Malvolio could be reading this with disappointing expressions at first, gradually turning into a large grin and great excitement when he realises it is addressed to him: "'M.O.A.I.' This simulation is not as the former, and yet, to crush this a little, it would bow to me, for every one of these letters are in my name."

  2. Examine the ways in which Shakespeare creates comedy for the audience in Act 3 ...

    families in the audience as they were very much a part of royal or privileged life during the Shakespearian period, and in my opinion this would help these people to relate slightly more to events in the play and make the ludicrous confusion of Twelfth Night seem slightly more probable.

  1. Discuss the theme of appearance and reality in Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night'.

    Whenever Maria is in the presence of Olivia and Malvolio is with her she always acts normal and well behaved but when Malvolio and she are alone she acts sinister towards Malvolio and also adds in a bit if sarcasm.

  2. Malvolio Makes a ‘Contemplative Idiot’ Out of Himself in The Box Tree Scene

    'Cut' was a vulgar word for vagina in the Renaissance period. Malvolio seems completely unaware of these puns, but Sir Andrew notices and finds this allusion to Olivia indelicate and obscene. He has to restrain himself from giving the plot away when he responds by calling 'Why that-' before the letter is continued.

  1. Looking at Act 2 scene 5 and Act 3 scene 4 consider the ...

    In Shakespeare's time the phrase referred to the female genitals. Of course Malvolio did not understand this joke and it went unnoticed by him, but would have been very funny to both audience and Sir Toby hiding in the bush.

  2. Assess the importance of 'The Garden Scene' to the development of Twelfth Night. How ...

    this scene; before he finds the letter his is dull and very puritanical, but he finally believes that Olivia loves him; and becomes happy, smiling, even more helplessly in love, and later 'yellow-stockinged'. However, it is not just Malvolio's character that changes in the scene.

  1. How does Shakespeare manipulate the audience to dislike Malvolio towards the beginning of the ...

    Modern audiences would not appreciate the severity of the threat. The audience like Maria for her wit and her part in the revelry, and now Malvolio has threatened her, the audience naturally concurs he is a malevolent character out to bring misery.

  2. Consider the ways in which love, obsession and disguise inform our understanding of the ...

    We see that he isn't just the poetic lover, but the melancholic lover who isn't really in love with Olivia but is in love with the concept of love. "The appetite may sicken and so die." This suggests to us that Orsino doesn't yet have self knowledge and sets up

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work