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How does Shakespeare make the audience feel about Juliet and her parent in Act 3 Scene 5 ?

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Introduction

Shakespeare Coursework December 2001 How does Shakespeare make the audience feel about Juliet and her parent in Act 3 Scene 5 It is not absolutely certain when Shakespeare wrote his play, "Romeo and Juliet," but it is believed to be between 1591 and 1596. This may well be one of Shakespeare's most famous romantic tragedies. It is renowned all over the world for the "pair of star crossed lovers" that unfortunately met an unfortunate and tragic death. Shakespeare got his inspiration for this play from two earlier writings that followed the same theme. These were "The tragical history of Romeus and Juliet" which was written around 1562 in the form of a long poem, by the writer Arthur Brooke. This "long poem" lasted a staggering 3 hours and was read to the audience, not performed. The second writer he could have got his inspiration from is William Painter who wrote "the goodly history of Rhomeo and Julietta" in 1567 in the form of a short story. It must be noted that Shakespeare didn't merle copy these two writers and pass the piece on as his own work. Shakespeare had to put a lot of work into Romeo and Juliet, as these works were no masterpiece even though they did inspire Shakespeare to write this marvellous play. ...read more.

Middle

Juliet will be very upset about Romeo leaving her and will want to go with him, but she can not. She will also be very upset and maybe angry when the marriage to Paris is proposed because she has just lost her husband that she has only been married to for a day and will also be in morning for her cousin Tybalt. In act 3 scene 5 Capulet uses very strong language to threaten and insult Juliet; he made such comments as, "Hang thee, young baggage, disobedient wretch!" Capulets strong language in this scene shows the Audience superiority over Juliet. From lines 126-137 (when he enters talking about his brother) his speech would make the audience feel sad for his brothers loss of his son and sad for Old Capulet for the loss of his nephew. In lines 149-168 the audience would feel angry and shocked towards Juliet for defying her father and the master of the house. They may also feel shock at the strong language Capulet is using against her "Hang thee, young baggage, disbedient wretch!" and they might feel shocked from the comment that he is going to hit Juliet; "My fingers itch". ...read more.

Conclusion

An Elizabethan audience would have shocked at Juliet defying her father and talking back to him, those things wouldn't happen in those days. They may well fell scared at what she is going to do if she if chucked out of the house, and they might feel anger towards her for defying her father. A modern audience on the other hand would take a totally different view to the situation. They would feel anger towards Old Capulet for cursing Juliet and not being with the person she loved, they would also think very dimly of an arranged marriage that involves no love in it. The audience might feel that Juliet's father has betrayed her by going back on his word that she also has consent to whom she is going to marry it is not just up to him. My conclusion is that this scene is full of mixed feelings and emotions and an audience of the Elizabethan time would be left feeling shocked at Juliet's behaviour and feeling her parent did right to threaten her into marrying Paris. While a modern day audience would feel that Juliet did hardly anything wrong and that her parents are to blame for over reacting and treating her apaulingly. ?? ?? ?? ?? K.Milonidis Page 1 02/05/2007 ...read more.

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