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How does Shakespeare make the opening scene of Romeo and Juliet interesting for the audience?

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Introduction

How does Shakespeare make the opening scene of Romeo and Juliet interesting for the audience? Shakespeare used a number of dramatic devices in the first scene of Romeo and Juliet; this made the play very interesting for the audience. By having a fight scene he drew the audience's attention to the play instantly, because in those days they would be chatting before the play starts and Shakespeare knew this and needed them to stop them talking. At the very beginning Sampson and Gregory are having a laugh and complaining about working, like peasants standing at the front would be doing. Seeing someone like yourself in a movie or something makes you like the character because you can relate to them, so that's what Shakespeare was trying to do with Sampson and Gregory. The rich people in them days would be laughing at the servants because they find it funny that they have to do so much work and rich people don't. Firstly, the prologue tells everyone what's happening in the play although we think it would spoil the play but really it makes us want to know more and think questions about the play. ...read more.

Middle

At the beginning of the scene Sampson is gloating and acting as though he is "hard" and Gregory is making fun of everything he says. An example of this is when they say "Sampson: A dog of the house of the Montague's moves me" "Gregory: to move is to stir: and to be valiant is to stand: I will take the wall of any man or maid of the Montague's". Here Sampson is saying the Montague's upset him and he see's them as animals not human he hates them that much. Gregory replies by saying Sampson is a coward and if anyone starts on him he'd run away. This shows their personality and how they tease each other. They are the servants of the Capulet's and yet they think they are one of them. Abraham and Balthazar are trying to start a fight with Gregory and Sampson because they know it's easy to do and they hate each other. The opening scene is done just to show how big the feud is; even the servants are involved! You can tell in act one scene one that Sampson, Gregory, Tybalt and Abraham just want to start a fight. ...read more.

Conclusion

Because they aren't in the feud you'd think they're family wouldn't mind them seeing each other but they don because they're Lord Montague and Lord Capulet's only children. In conclusion, I think Shakespeare did make the opening scene on Romeo and Juliet interesting for the audience, because he really did connect with the audience. He connected with everyone well; he connected with the upper class by showing Lord Montague and Lord Capulet. He connected with the peasants by putting the servants there and how they complained about working- because if you're a peasant you must work hard for little pay and it's nice to know your not the only one. He gave them a few laugh, made their jaw drop by them fighting and made them really feel interested. He actually knew what made people interested seeing as they are going to watch this for two hours (mostly stood up!). He helped us know what the characters are like by the name they have. The action scene I think really drew the audience in and made them think they want to see more. Even the prologue drew the audience in, by saying what's going to happen made them want to know more and ask questions. The only way their questions are going to be answered is by watching the rest of it... ?? ?? ?? ?? Sara Jafari ...read more.

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