• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Shakespeare make the reader expect that death will be inevitable for Romeo and Juliet?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Shakespeare make the reader expect that death will be inevitable for Romeo and Juliet? From the very beginning of 'Romeo and Juliet' we know that death is inevitable for these two lovers. In the prologue Romeo and Juliet are described as "A pair of star crossed lovers." this quotation tells us that these two are not meant to be together because of what their future holds for them. We are then told that these two "take their life" and will "bury their parents' strife". This we know is good for the "two foes", as they have had an "ancient grudge" which has started a "new mutiny" but the sad thing is that they had to lose their only children to stop feuding. From Act 1 Scene 1 a fight is started between the Capulet and Montague servants this immediately tells us Shakespeare has deliberately done this to show us how much revulsion these two families have for each other. So Shakespeare puts into perspective for us that Romeo and Juliet getting together is unattainable. In Act 1 of 'Romeo and Juliet' Shakespeare shows tragedy is inevitable in many ways. ...read more.

Middle

Romeo and his friends decided to gate crash the party because the Montague are not invited because of the ancient grudge. The first time Romeo gets a glimpse of Juliet he asks a nearby servant "What lady's that which doth enrich the hand of yonder knight?" The servant does not have an answer to his question but Romeo is not disheartened by this minor set back and keeps on pursuing her. Tybalt recognises Romeo's voice which proves to us that even the voice of a Montague is enough for these Capulet's to stir hatred in them. This just again tells us Romeo and Juliet will die even if they are caught talking. Tybalt wants to kill the Old Montague's family he is so raged by hearing Romeo's voice he shouts out in frustration "get my rapier boy" this shows us the amount of revolution that these two families have for each other. Old Capulet tells Tybalt "Let him alone" telling him to stay well clear of Romeo. When Romeo finally talks to Juliet he flirts with her "To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss". this tells us Romeo is over Rosaline and has a new beauty to love. ...read more.

Conclusion

When Tybalt's death is announced Lady Capulet tells us that "The Montague's shall pay for this with their own blood". Meaning that the Montague's will have to give their own blood (Romeo) up for the murder of Tybalt. This hints to the audience the ending Shakespeare structured all of his plays in a certain way. This specific way was that Shakespeare plotted a good event followed by a tragic event. He portrayed this particular structure in Romeo and Juliet well. A example of this is when Romeo falls In love with Juliet and in the next scene the tragic event is Lady Capulet wants Juliet to marry Paris, we as a reader already know that Romeo and Juliet is not meant to be. Because we are told so in the prologue from the very beginning of the play Romeo and Juliet 'Will take their lives' to 'End their parent's strife'. Shakespeare led the two main characters into the situation where they declare their love for each other. However the prologue has already cast a shadow on this love. The circumstances and coincidences, which follow, are so strong and powerful that even though Romeo and Juliet's love is perfect they cannot win over the events that build against them. So ultimately they cannot be united in life but become united in death. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work