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How does Shakespeare make you feel increasingly sympathetic towards Juliet?

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Introduction

Adrianna Harold 05.11.02 GCSE English: Romeo and Juliet How does Shakespeare make you feel increasingly sympathetic towards Juliet? William Shakespeare wrote Romeo and Juliet in 1595 and it is still popular today. Its full title is "The Most Excellent and Lamentable Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet". It is a romantic tragedy set in Verona, about two lovers, whose families are at war with each other. I am concentrating on Act III scene V, but I will summarise the story up to this scene. So far, two lovers Romeo and Juliet agree to be married even though they are from warring families. For this reason, Juliet does not tell her parents that she has got married. In Act III, the families fight and Juliet's cousin, Tybalt, kills Romeo's best friend Mercutio. In a furious rage, Romeo kills Tybalt and is banished to Mantua, on the outskirts of Verona. Meanwhile, Juliet is in turmoil, her cousin has just been murdered and her husband has been banished. ...read more.

Middle

"Here comes your father; tell him so yourself..." (Line 124) This shows how Lady Capulet abandons her daughter when she needs her support most. Capulet gets angry about Juliet's refusal and warns her that she will be disowned if she does not do as she is told. He is deeply bewildered and does not know why Juliet has refused; he concludes that she is being ungrateful. "How? Doth she not give us thanks?" (Line 142). He starts to go over the top, with his fury, and insults Juliet "What is this? "Proud" and yet "not proud"? (You will) go to Saint Peter's church, or I will drag thee on a hurdle thither. Out, you green-sickness carrion!" He insults her deeply and so the nurse steps in and takes on the role of Lady Capulet, by sticking up for Juliet and trying to protect her. Lady Capulet now appears to stick up for the nurse by telling Capulet to calm down "You are too hot." (Line 176) ...read more.

Conclusion

(Line 213) The audience is shocked at this point, because the nurse has been the one person who has stayed by Juliet. After the betrayal of the nurse, Juliet becomes even more vulnerable. Juliet was very close to the nurse, perhaps closer than she was to her mother, and assumed that nurse would stand by her and support her. Juliet is now completely alone in the world, and Shakespeare emphasises this by leaving her alone in her room as she says the words "Myself have the power to die". The audience is especially sympathetic with Juliet now, because she feels she only has one option left, and that is to kill herself. In conclusion, Shakespeare makes the reader increasingly sympathetic by introducing immense emotions of sorrow and sadness for Juliet, because she has lost her family and her one true love, Romeo. The reader has to feel sorry for Juliet, because the other characters, her mother and father for instance, are portrayed as uncaring and unkind to Juliet. In addition, Juliet's true situation, which we already know about at the start of the scene, is significant; because it shows the confusion of her parents and how it affects the way they speak and behave. ...read more.

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