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How does Shakespeare present emotional relationships in Act 3 Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet?

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Introduction

How does Shakespeare present emotional relationships in Act 3 Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet? Before Act 3 Scene 5, Romeo and Tybalt had a fight with one another, which resulted in Tybalt being killed. As Romeo was the person that murdered him, he has been banished from Verona. The beginning of Act 3 Scene 5 is the morning after Romeo and Juliet had secretly spent their first night together. Juliet is in a dilemma at the beginning of the scene. She has just secretly married Montague Romeo, who is now leaving as he has been banished. The audience know that Romeo and Juliet are going to die, as the play is a tragedy. Shakespeare shows the intensity of Romeo and Juliet's love by the language they use, and the fact that they do not want to leave each other. Juliet tries to persuade Romeo that he does not have to leave at the very beginning of the scene, by saying, "Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet day: It was the nightingale, and not the lark, that pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear." ...read more.

Middle

Lady Capulet just says, "Fie, fie, what, are you mad?" Mothers have a reputation of being soft and kind, so we expected Lady Capulet to act this way to Juliet, but she showed no sympathy towards her. However, it is important for Lady Capulet to act this way, otherwise Juliet would have had a shoulder to cry on and would not feel so alone. If Juliet felt this way, then she would not want to die. Capulet initially approaches Juliet in a kind and joking way, trying to cheer her up by joking about her being a fountain from crying so much. When Capulet finds out that Juliet refuses to marry Paris, he is very angry. He reacts this way, because he has spent a lot of time and effort organising the wedding, and thinks that Juliet is ungrateful. Juliet feels that her father's request is terrible, because she is already married to Romeo, who she loves, and she hates the idea of an arranged marriage. The way that Juliet behaved to her father would have been seen as rude, because in the Elizabethan period a father had complete control over the women in his family, and women were not allowed to express their opinion. ...read more.

Conclusion

Juliet is left devastated by the end of the scene, and just wants to die. She can not believe that the nurse does not give her any sympathy, and basically says that Paris is a lot better than Romeo, and she should just get on with her life and marry Paris. At that point Juliet decides that she is going to kill herself. The emotional pace has changed throughout the scene. At the beginning of the scene Romeo and Juliet were very happy because they had spent their first night together, but then they were upset as they knew that Romeo had to leave. After Romeo left, Juliet was crying hysterically. Lady Capulet thought that Juliet was grieving for her cousin Tybalt's death and thought that telling her that she was going to marry Paris would cheer her up. Juliet refused to marry Paris, which was when she had a huge row with Capulet. Nobody defended Juliet, including the nurse who is her best friend. Juliet was left feeling devastated at the end of the scene, which is when she decided she was going to kill herself. Danielle Miles 10A ...read more.

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