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How does Shakespeare show us other types of conflict and its effects in the play, Romeo and Juliet?

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Introduction

How does Shakespeare show us other types of conflict and its effects in the play, "Romeo and Juliet"? The language used in scenes of conflict gives the measure of nearly all the characters. Shakespeare uses the language to define the complexion of each role in the play and to give each of them an unique personality. In Act 1 Scene 5, Tybalt is angered by Romeo's presence in he Capulet's household, but Lord Capulet demands that he leave Romeo be: "A villain that is hither come in spite, to scorn at our solemnity this night...He shall be endured. What, goodman boy, I say he shall, go to!" ...read more.

Middle

By using these opposing oxymorons, Shakespeare plays on the conflict inside Romeo's head; His emotions, his opinion of love and his outlook on life. In Act 4 Scene 5, Lord Capulet is grieving for Juliet's supposed death, comparing her wedding-to-be with her funeral: "All things that we ordained festival, Turn from their office to black funeral, Our instruments to melancholy bells, Our weeding cheer to a sad burial feast." These conflicting antithesis express the anguish and bereavement that Lord Capulet is facing as he comes to terms with the fact that Juliet's funeral will happen instead of her wedding. Physical violence plays an important role in the progression of 'Romeo and Juliet' as it is the motive of the key event in each act. ...read more.

Conclusion

I am peppered, I warrant, for this world. A plague on both your houses!" Mercutio curses both families for his death because of the murderous feud that is fought between them. Had Tybalt not come to challenge Romeo to a duel for his honour as a Capulet, then Mercutio need not of died to save Romeo's honour as a Montague. Shakespeare uses Mercutio's death to spur Romeo on to regain his honour and kill Tybalt, which has dire consequences for both the Montagues and the Capulets. These acts of violence change the tone of the play from, at the end of Act 2, happiness and joy for the marriage of Romeo and Juliet, to darkness and despair for both families at the loss of Tybalt and Mercutio. ...read more.

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