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How does Shakespeare use dramatic devices in Act 3 scene 1 of "Romeo and Juliet" in order to make it such an interesting, exciting and important scene?

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Introduction

English Coursework How does Shakespeare use dramatic devices in Act 3 scene 1 of "Romeo and Juliet" in order to make it such an interesting, exciting and important scene? In the story of Romeo and Juliet, two "star-crossed" lovers from feuding families marry in secret. When Romeo murders Juliet's cousin in a fight he is banished from the city of Verona. Juliet's family, not knowing about the marriage, prepare for Juliet to marry The County Paris. Juliet goes to Friar Laurence (who married Romeo and Juliet) for help. The Friar gives Juliet a poison that will help her to feign death by slowing her heart rate. Juliet takes the poison but Romeo, in the nearby village of Mantua, hears of Juliet's "death" and so, believing her to actually be dead, travels to Verona to visit her tomb. There he kills himself moments before Juliet awakens. Juliet sees Romeo's dead body and stabs herself with a dagger. After the deaths of their only children, the Montagues and Capulets become at peace with each other. The play is a tragedy because, although there is humour in the play, through the character Mercutio, the ending is very upsetting and the mood of the play seems to become extremely tense and desperate, especially after the deaths of Mercutio (Romeo's friend) ...read more.

Middle

Even from the very beginning of the play, Romeo and Juliet seemed to be leading towards a battle. The chorus says that "From ancient grudge break to new mutiny." This means that the old feud will lead to new violence. Near the start of the play, two servants from the feuding families fight causing Benvolio and Tybalt to become involved and eventually Montague and Capulet themselves threaten to join the violence. This shows just how easily the feuding families can turn to violence and even readily kill each other. The prince arrives in time to intervene and prevent anyone from getting injured but he warns the families that anyone caught street-fighting will be sentenced to death. This would interest the audience in act 3 scene 1 when fighting breaks out. In act 1 scene 5, Tybalt vows revenge on Romeo for sneaking into a Capulet banquet, this also hints at further violence and links to the fight scene in act 3 scene 1. The feud between the Montagues and the Capulets affects every part of the play, although Shakespeare never mentions why or how the feud started. In act 3 scene 1, Tybalt talks to Mercutio and Benvolio to attempt to find Romeo and get revenge after he sneaked into the Capulet's banquet. ...read more.

Conclusion

Immediately we do exile him hence." The rhyme in this part of the play is probably used to indicate the end of the scene. It would sound more interesting to the audience to hear the lines spoken in rhyme. The rhythm and pace of the lines changes throughout Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare changes the length of sentences and uses rhyme to do this. This helps to keep audiences interested and add to the drama. In act 3 scene 1 Shakespeare has used a number of dramatic devices to interest the audience, he has used language and change of rhythm, (the Prince's words at the end of the scene) metaphor and similes, (Mercutio's words before he dies) and religious imagery (Mercutio's death.) The fight scenes would be visually entertaining and there are a lot of very dramatic moments in the scene (before Romeo kills Tybalt, for example.) The scene starts humorously, with Mercutio making puns and using words with double meanings, to great effect on the audience. From when Mercutio says "O calm, dishonourable, vile submission." The humour is gone and the audience are on the edge of their seats until the end of the scene. Overall I think that act 3 scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet is a tense, exciting scene with the potential to be acted in an overdramatic, very powerful way. Kayleigh Wilcock Page 1 ...read more.

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