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How does Shakespeare use imagery and language to create tension towards an explosion of violence, which results in the death of Tybalt and the banishment of Romeo?

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Introduction

How does Shakespeare use imagery and language to create tension towards an explosion of violence, which results in the death of Tybalt and the banishment of Romeo? By Jess McFarlane 11WM Shakespeare uses a particular style of writing to display and create tension towards an explosion of violence but he always links it to the audience. He uses rhyming couplets, which is how he rhymes the last to words of each line in a speech. This gives an effect of emphasis on what the characters are speaking and this then lets the audience realise and understand more what they are actually talking about and it also gives an effect of importance to the audience as well, it makes them more involved and intrigued. An example of this is when Benvolio comments on the death of Mercutio "This day's black fate on moe days doth depend, this but begins the woe others must end". ...read more.

Middle

Mercutio's description of Benvolio perceives him as a very hot-tempered person "thou art as hot as Jack" and he mentions this directly to the audience so the scene of tension is boosted even more and to get his point across to give more emphasis on the fact, Mercutio uses repetition in his speech, "Thou wilt quarrel... full of quarrels... out such a quarrel... thou hast quarrelled". A continuous repetition of this word makes the audience wonder about Benvolio's ill-mannered temper, again the tension rises. One also notices the fact that Mercutio talks about Benvolio's temper in a list, again to give the effect of pace and once again raises the anticipation of the audience towards the tension. Humour is also used within the content of Shakespeare's writing but as he uses comment this also builds up tension. Mercutio teases Tybalt with Tybalt start the conversation off and then Mercutio twisting his words and using them against him "Thou consortest with Romeo" and the reply "here's my fiddlestick, here's that shall make you dance" and his style of wording is one that is looking for a fight. ...read more.

Conclusion

Then the use of the phrase "fired eyed fury" builds the tension again, an insult and this is returned to Romeo with "wretched boy". The death of Tybalt follows and only then there is a release of tension as Benvolio explains the situation to Prince. We then run to the scene and this maybe thought as the last and best tension as Lady Capulet pronounces that "Romeo must not live" and the Prince's decree "Let Romeo hence in haste...when he's found, that hour his last." And this leaves the scene a cliffhanger to what will happen after this. She in simple terms demands a life for a life "For blood of ours shed of Monatgue". The tension throughout this scene reaches to firey climaxes and is not really released throughout and this is what would keep the audience on their toes to find out what will happen next and the way in which Shakespeare writes is so incredible that he can include so many different styles to create such scenes of tension such as this one. ...read more.

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