• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Shakespeare use language to convey Prospero's character in act one scene two

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Shakespeare use language to convey Prosperos character in Act 1 Scene 2? Shakespeare shows his characters to be unique. They each have extraordinary characteristics ands personalities in the play. The main character whom I am going to concentrate on is Prospero. I will be focusing on his gestures and language and how this suits his character in the tempest. Prospero is a powerful, sharp, determined and a loving farther. He is willing to change and can also become mercurial at times. Prospero is considerate yet stern. So how does Shakespeare use language to convey prosperos character? Example one: Prospero uses similes, metaphors and detailed description to emphasis the horror of Ariel's situation before he came to the island. This highlights his own power as he sets Ariel free. ...read more.

Middle

Prospero is anxious, and hurls questions at Ariel, Prospero is relying on Ariel to do all his work and tasks for him. Prospero fires Ariel a series of short and fast questions such as: "But was not this nigh shore"? " But are they Ariel, safe"? At this point Prospero is shown to be anxious, impatient and urgent about his work. Prospero gives Ariel long and reproachful speeches because he wants to keep Ariel in line and make her understand. At one point in act 1 scene 2 Prospero bestows a long speech to Ariel, talking again about sycorax and how Ariel was entrapped by her. Ariel now can no longer talk about his freedom, after being indulged by this powerful speech from Prospero. Ariel can no longer say anything in his own favour. ...read more.

Conclusion

When Prospero threatens Ariel, he blackmails as well, to remind Ariel of the incident involving sycorax. That way Ariel understands how generous and merciful prosperos is. The way Prospero addresses Ariel and Caliban is a sign of his power and authority. Quote: Why that's my spirit! Quote: Come forth, I say! Thou poisonous slave, got by the devil himself upon thy wicked dam, come forth! Prospero sees a lot of difference between Ariel and Caliban. Ariel is a humble, loyal, dependable SERVANT And Prospero hates Caliban, and so calls him a SLAVE Prospero addresses Ariel with a sign of respect. As Ariel is loyal, and listens to everything Prospero says. Prospero has no respect for Caliban, as Caliban tried to rape Miranda; Prospero addresses him as slave, and hates him. This shows that Prospero has a lot of power over both Ariel and Caliban. And his authority is much higher than both. ?? ?? ?? ?? Written by Adil ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE The Tempest section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE The Tempest essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Prospero is a powerful character. What impression does the audience get of Prospero in ...

    4 star(s)

    marriage is working, saying "at the first sight they have changed eyes. Delicate Ariel, I'll set thee free for this", but decides that he must upset things temporarily in order to prevent their relationship developing too quickly and to test Ferdinand's love.

  2. In what ways does Prospero use (and abuse) his power? Has he learned anything ...

    This irrational punishment for a wild creature like Caliban is an example of Prospero being quick to use and abuse his power. When Caliban bumps into Stephano and Trinculo, who are not under Prospero's power as he did not know they were on the island as yet, he begs to

  1. The Change in Prospero's Character.

    Due to their dire circumstances at the start of the play, we should feel compassion for Prospero. Nonetheless, His possession and use of magical knowledge renders him extremely powerful and not entirely sympathetic. This is shown to a great extent in act 1 scene 2.

  2. " Ariel is a mischievous sprit, but is rather that one character that holds ...

    (1ii line 196-198) This shows excitement. It was all an illusion caused by her, that is why she was amused. I think this gives the audience a taste of her mischievous side to come. After reassuring Prospero that everyone is safe, she then asks about her ' Liberty', Prospero replies 'Before the time be out?

  1. How is the theme of magic presented in Act 1 Scene 2 of The ...

    a mental picture of Prospero marking a magic circle in the ground. Stage directions make the island seem more magical, as they are like the Shakespearean special effects, because in Shakespeare's days they did not have any of the special effects that we have now a days in our films like smoke screens, lasers, and bright lights.

  2. How does Shakespeare use the chracters of Prospero, Ariel, and Caliban, to explore human ...

    He counteracts his own good deeds with a forceful display of his own magical power, threatening to trap Ariel up in the tree like the witch, Sycorax did. Prospero exercises control both physically and intellectually by controlling the way Ariel and Miranda think about their lives, he makes

  1. How does the relationship between Prospero and Ariel change during the tempest

    Lady Macbeth already implies that she is going to do so with, "Thus thou must do, if thou have it." As we can see that Lady Macbeth believes that there is no chance that they must kill Duncan if they are to be king and queen.

  2. Explore the dramatic impact of the tempest scene in Act 1, Scene 1 in ...

    The storm in King Lear makes him see what is really going on and to actually realise what the true natures of his daughters Goneril and Regan were. Thus this storm reflects his anger and realisation, his emotional struggle. However The Tempest, in my view is not used for the

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work