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How does Shakespeare use the Wedding Scene toSurprise the Audience and to Show the Power of Men in the 16th Century? Much Ado About Nothing.

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Introduction

How does Shakespeare use the Wedding Scene to Surprise the Audience and to Show the Power of Men in the 16th Century? Much Ado About Nothing. In the play 'Much ado About Nothing', Shakespeare uses the power of men to surprise the audience in the wedding scene and to give the play an unexpected twist. When Don John took Claudio and Don Pedro to the outside of Hero's balcony, Claudio believed Don Johns words because he was watching what he thought was Hero and another man in Hero's room, and was thinking all the things that could be happening. ...read more.

Middle

Because of Hero 'playing around', Don Pedro may lose a friend and lose the reputation with the people of Messina. In the wedding scene, after Claudio, Don John and Don Pedro have said there words against Hero, Leonarto believes them over his own daughter without any proof. "Would the two princes lie? And Claudio lie?" The princes were honourable men and without any proof Leonarto still believed them because men had more power then women and were believed over women. Once Leonarto thinks straight he starts to believe his daughter Hero and forgives her. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the production we saw, Claudio was mainly marring Hero because of Leonarto's money. Leonarto had no son, so by marring Hero it would mean Leonarto's money would go straight to Claudio, not Hero. Men wanted there Daughters to be married to a good man so they know when they pass away, there daughters will have a good life with there husband. So this is why Hero still marries Claudio after he has hit her, embarrassed her in front of the whole town and called her a 'whore' and such. "Come, lady, die to live. This wedding day Perhaps is but prolonged. Have patience and endure." Men were so powerful that fathers wanted there daughters to marry the best man so she would be high class and respected because of her husband. ...read more.

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