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How does Shelley create sympathy for the Monster, as well as for Victor Frankenstein, in the novel, Frankenstein?

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Introduction

How does Shelley create sympathy for the Monster, as well as for Victor Frankenstein, in the novel, 'Frankenstein'? Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, born 30th August 1797 was the anonymous writer who was idolised over due to her novel, 'Frankenstein'. She was a literary icon in the romanticism era in the early 1800s. The globally famous novel was published in 1818 when Shelly was at the age of 21. Shelley decided to submit her novel anonymously as in that stage in history women were not taken seriously in society and were victims of sexist and prejudiced movements. The novel was originally a ghost story in which she wrote while being overwhelmed by a series of calamities in her life; the worst of these were the suicide of her half-sister, Fanny Imlay. Frankenstein is considered to be the greatest gothic romantic novel in history and also thought of as the first science fiction novel. Gothic horror was a common genre of use in the time Frankenstein was written. This was a time of great novels such as Dracula and Hound of the Baskervilles. Gothic horror is traditionally set in dark castles and countryside with eerie moaning music and bad weather. ...read more.

Middle

Beautiful - great god!" This show that Frankenstein was trying to make a beautiful creature, but in his minds eye he thought it was despairingly ugly. After the creature has awoken, and Frankenstein is disgusted and frightened, the turning point in the relationship between the creation and creator begins to unfold. This is the place in the book when Frankenstein awakens from sleep, "I beheld the wretch, the miserable monster whom I created...his jaws opened and he muttered some inarticulate sounds...one hand was reached out seemingly to detain me". However, this could be interpreted in two ways. One way to understand it is how Frankenstein saw the action or an action of violence towards the man who created this monstrous beast. However, it could also be interpreted like this - a peace offering to a stranger or a greeting to the man who is effectively its father. Frankenstein however, chooses to take the first line of thought and runs off, abandoning the creature to fend for itself. It is in chapter eleven that the creature starts narrating the tale. He is talking to his creator Victor Frankenstein, telling him the story since he abandoned him in his laboratory in the university. ...read more.

Conclusion

Basically the monster was denied it's human rights, and that is not acceptable however ugly or deformed something is. I believe that in Frankenstein, there are many connections to modern day science, medicine and normal life. For example, Victor Frankenstein was attempting to create the perfect human, much as the scientists of today are. Victor Frankenstein was attempting to give life to corpses, as are modern scientists. The creature was abandoned at birth as a lot of children are currently in the world, and finally the creature was denied basic human rights as many people in third world countries are today. So although she did not realise it, Mary Shelley may have put a moral to this tale that is still relevant in modern times. Mary Shelley may have been trying to make several points in her novel. At the time it was written many new scientific studies were being undertaken and the Darwin theory was attacking the church's beliefs, so why couldn't this type of thing happen. However, it may also be a warning to scientists to not mess with nature, as bad things can happen. Yet maybe she was purely trying to write a novel. Ben Davies 10F2 - - Page 1 of 5 - ...read more.

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