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How does Shelley shape the response of the reader towards the creation in his final chapter of narration?

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Introduction

How does Shelley shape the response of the reader towards the creation in his final chapter of narration? In the final chapter of creation's narration the reader sympathises with the creation and by this point Shelley has ensured that the reader considers Victor Frankenstein to be more of a monster than the creation itself. Shelley has formed the image of the creation being an intelligent, kind-hearted human being who longs to be accepted socially, as well as his undying wish for compassion. However, all of this can never become true for the creation, as he is rejected from society due to his physical appearance. In this final chapter of the creation's narration, Shelley emphasises the reader's feelings of sympathy using a variety of ways. However, Shelley alters the reader's perception of the creature towards the end of the chapter and he really is considered as a monster. ...read more.

Middle

Shelley has used light as a manifestation of the monsters emotions, this use of light and dark in alliance with emotions has not only been used by Shelley in this chapter but also in the chapter where the creature is given life. Another technique used by Shelley to shape the response of the reader towards the creation is the use of animal imagery. This powerful connotation creates fear within the reader, however it also adds to the already established feelings of sympathy created previously by Shelley. "I gave vent to my anguish in fearful howlings. I was like a wild beast...ranging through the woods with a staglike swiftness." This imagery allows the reader to visualise the creation as super-human and wolf-like. The untamed and wild suggestion created by Shelley accentuates the unfortunate circumstances the creation has experienced and heightens the pity felt by the reader. ...read more.

Conclusion

In this chapter Shelley uses language not usually associated with the emotions the monster is feeling, "Feelings of revenge and hate filled my bosom...allowing myself to be borne away by the stream, I bent my head towards injury and pain." The Idea of the dark emotions filling his bosom is a very unusual terminology as it is normally sentiments associated with love that fill ones bosom. The passion of the emotions felt by the creation show how helpless he is towards apposing the feelings. These irrepressible feelings are emphasised by the association with the stream and the on going flow of its path. Also the monster is forced to accept these emotions, "I bent my head towards injury and pain," amplifies the reader's pity for the creation. Towards the end of the chapter the reader's response towards the monster is dramatically changed, sympathy is transformed into a combination of shock and disgust. ...read more.

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