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How does Stevenson create a sense of horror, mystery and tension in the first two chapters of his novel "Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde"?

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Introduction

How does Stevenson create a sense of horror, mystery and tension in the first two chapters of his novel "Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde"? There are many ways in which Stephenson creates a sense of horror in his book "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde." I will be looking at how he does it in the first two chapters. Some of the tactics he uses include the way in which he describes his characters and even the way he describes the places. The techniques he uses are horror, mystery and tension. The first two chapters are very important as they set the scene for the book, so it makes sense to start here. Firstly I will portray the way Stephenson describes some of the characters. The first character that Stephenson describes is Mr Utterson. Mr Utterson is a hard man to understand he's emotionless. One of the passages in the book describes him as "Inhuman." The way Stephenson gets this across is not by saying it but by implying it. "At friendly meetings and when the wine is to his taste, something eminently human beacons in his eye." Other ways in which he is portrayed is cold, scanty yet somehow loveable. ...read more.

Middle

This gives a sense of mystery how can he be that evil. Mr Utterson also says "O my poor old Harry Jekyll, if I ever read Satan's signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend. That is the second time Stevenson has used Satan both directed towards Mr Hyde. The writer gives a feeling of horror, tension and mystery, can this person give off an impression of being commonly evil while being seen by someone for the first time. Mr Hyde is described as "Pale and dwarfish; he gave an impression of deformity without any nameable malformation. Everybody that has met Mr Hyde has also said that he has got a deformity without any nameable malformation. This is mystery in its self as no one can even give a decent description of his face when there the ones to have seen him. "He had a displeasing smile, he had borne himself to the lawyer with a sort of murderous mixture of timidity and boldness." The Author gives a lot of contradictions to show the nature of Mr Hyde's beginnings. "He spoke with a husky whispering and somewhat broken voice, -all these were points against him; but not all of these together could explain the hitherto unknown disgust, loathing and fear with which Mr Utterson regarded him." ...read more.

Conclusion

The atmosphere changes even more for the worse when something is read in the will "In the case of the decease of Henry Jekyll, M.D., .C.L. LL.D, F.R.S., &C., all his possessions were to pass into the hands of his friend and benefactor Edward Hyde'; but that in the case of Dr Jekyll's 'disappearance or unexplained absence exceeding three calendar months', the said Edward Hyde should step into the said Henry Jekyll's shoes without further delay, and free from any burthen or obligation, beyond the payment of a few small sums to members of the doctors household." This seems a bit peculiar as why would Jekyll want to make sure that this is in his will, is it because he is being blackmailed. There are many mysteries now that have come up and can no longer be restricted. This is an important part of the book which needs to have a lot of atmosphere; it is like Stevenson has underlined it with atmosphere to show how important this is. In conclusion Stevenson, the author has tried and succeeded at creating a sense of mystery, horror and tension. Throughout the book he has been building up tension. There are a lot of techniques used in the first two chapters mainly associated with Mr Hyde. Stevenson makes Mr Hyde the object of mystery, horror and tension ...read more.

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