• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Stevenson create a sense of horror, mystery and tension in the first two chapters of his novel "Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde"?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Stevenson create a sense of horror, mystery and tension in the first two chapters of his novel "Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde"? There are many ways in which Stephenson creates a sense of horror in his book "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde." I will be looking at how he does it in the first two chapters. Some of the tactics he uses include the way in which he describes his characters and even the way he describes the places. The techniques he uses are horror, mystery and tension. The first two chapters are very important as they set the scene for the book, so it makes sense to start here. Firstly I will portray the way Stephenson describes some of the characters. The first character that Stephenson describes is Mr Utterson. Mr Utterson is a hard man to understand he's emotionless. One of the passages in the book describes him as "Inhuman." The way Stephenson gets this across is not by saying it but by implying it. "At friendly meetings and when the wine is to his taste, something eminently human beacons in his eye." Other ways in which he is portrayed is cold, scanty yet somehow loveable. ...read more.

Middle

This gives a sense of mystery how can he be that evil. Mr Utterson also says "O my poor old Harry Jekyll, if I ever read Satan's signature upon a face, it is on that of your new friend. That is the second time Stevenson has used Satan both directed towards Mr Hyde. The writer gives a feeling of horror, tension and mystery, can this person give off an impression of being commonly evil while being seen by someone for the first time. Mr Hyde is described as "Pale and dwarfish; he gave an impression of deformity without any nameable malformation. Everybody that has met Mr Hyde has also said that he has got a deformity without any nameable malformation. This is mystery in its self as no one can even give a decent description of his face when there the ones to have seen him. "He had a displeasing smile, he had borne himself to the lawyer with a sort of murderous mixture of timidity and boldness." The Author gives a lot of contradictions to show the nature of Mr Hyde's beginnings. "He spoke with a husky whispering and somewhat broken voice, -all these were points against him; but not all of these together could explain the hitherto unknown disgust, loathing and fear with which Mr Utterson regarded him." ...read more.

Conclusion

The atmosphere changes even more for the worse when something is read in the will "In the case of the decease of Henry Jekyll, M.D., .C.L. LL.D, F.R.S., &C., all his possessions were to pass into the hands of his friend and benefactor Edward Hyde'; but that in the case of Dr Jekyll's 'disappearance or unexplained absence exceeding three calendar months', the said Edward Hyde should step into the said Henry Jekyll's shoes without further delay, and free from any burthen or obligation, beyond the payment of a few small sums to members of the doctors household." This seems a bit peculiar as why would Jekyll want to make sure that this is in his will, is it because he is being blackmailed. There are many mysteries now that have come up and can no longer be restricted. This is an important part of the book which needs to have a lot of atmosphere; it is like Stevenson has underlined it with atmosphere to show how important this is. In conclusion Stevenson, the author has tried and succeeded at creating a sense of mystery, horror and tension. Throughout the book he has been building up tension. There are a lot of techniques used in the first two chapters mainly associated with Mr Hyde. Stevenson makes Mr Hyde the object of mystery, horror and tension ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Robert Louis Stevenson section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Robert Louis Stevenson essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    How does Stevenson create a sense of dramatic tension in the chapter The Last ...

    5 star(s)

    Utterson cross-examines him and they conclude that the figure within may be Mr Hyde - a known murderer. This leads inevitably, in the minds of both the investigators and the reader, to the hypothesis that Dr Jekyll has been murdered by Mr Hyde, and that he still lurks within the cabinet.

  2. How does Stevenson create the atmosphere of suspense, horror and mystery in the first ...

    At the point where Enfield discovers that he is not by himself, Stevenson cleverly uses the word 'figures' instead of people. This is to create a sense of horror and suspense as you do not know who these 'figures' are, and there's no confirmation if they're human or not, or even their reason to be out.

  1. how does Robert Louis Stevenson Create a sense of Mystery, Horror and Suspense ...

    Mr. Enfield says that the man he saw was "of the name Hyde". This name has a eerie ring to it, it carries a certain mystique. When people hear the name Hyde they immediately think of secrecy and what is the secrecy for.

  2. Chapter 1: Story of the Door

    He prepared the potion and describes in bitter and horrific detail the painful transformation that occurs after taking the potion and transforming into Hyde. He postulates that the evil side of his nature was less developed, smaller, younger than Henry Jekyll.

  1. How does R. L. Stevenson create horror and suspense in the novel 'Dr Jekyll ...

    This door creates secrecy and suspense because it is always locked and you can only enter with a key, also the windows are always shut. At the start of this chapter we are immediately introduced to one of the main characters, Mr Utterson; he appears complex as there are contradictions

  2. How did Stevenson create horror and tension around the character of Hyde?

    This, once again, compounds Hyde's ghastliness. Mr Enfield is recounting this horrific experience to Mr Utterson, a main character who is a lawyer. Mr Utterson has a nightmare after hearing the treacherous account. This, once again gives Stevenson the opportunity to recreate the tension that surrounds his infamous character.

  1. How does Stevenson create an atmosphere of mystery and suspense yet at the same ...

    It could be unleashed if not controlled. In addition to constructing a profound statement about the observation of the human personality, Stevenson intended to create a gripping story filled with murder and drama while occupying the reader in a mind of mystery and suspense before the final two chapters.

  2. " How effective is the setting in creating tension and suspense in Stevenson's works?"

    a hostile environment, and it makes the reader feel worried, and uncomfortable. "The town had not yet awakened", this can create the effect that, there is not a single person awake in town, to help someone if they are in trouble.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work