• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Stevenson create the atmosphere of suspense, horror and mystery in the first two chapters of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Stevenson create the atmosphere of suspense, horror and mystery in the first two chapters of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde? Stevenson uses many methods to achieve suspense, mystery and horror in the first two chapters of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde. He does this by using a clever sense of setting, vocabulary, surroundings and the manner his characters are described. Some of these are highlighted in the depiction of the house; Enfield's story; Henry Jekyll will and the meeting with Hyde. One of the chapters where Stevenson creates an atmosphere of mystery is in Chapter one, Story of the Door. This story is not of any door, but of 'the' door. The reader expects something to happen, yet you are thrown off course. The novel starts with an introduction to Mr Utterson, a man who was 'never lighted by a smile' yet 'somehow lovable'; Utterson seems to be an ordinary person, however he's the very first thing mentioned in 'the story of the door'. The setting in this chapter is described in such still and calm scenery: The street 'shone' out, 'freshly' painted shutters, general 'cleanliness'. The reader is not ready for an act of suspense, especially in such a calm environment. ...read more.

Middle

So when this cruel occurrence occurs, it is more surprising and unexpected. Stevenson highlights how callous this act is through a chain of aggressive verbs, 'screaming', and 'hellish', 'trampled'. As well, the abrupt contrast of 'one little man who was stumping' to 'some damned juggernaut' is horrifying since our character is described as an unstoppable force, and you do not know what else he is capable of doing. The unexpected change from 'one little man' to 'some damned juggernaut' is scary, as you do not know when he is going to change from one to the other, thus everything seems more tense and sudden than usual, creating a sense of suspense and horror. In addition to Stevenson using setting to create a sense of suspense, horror and mystery, he goes on to create mystery through Jekyll's will. Although the reader expects there to be some mystery and suspense in the second chapter from reading the title 'Search for Mr Hyde', Stevenson exceeds this in making it surprisingly more mysterious. He does this through Dr Jekyll will. One of the very first things the will says: that in case of Dr Jekyll 'disappearance or unexplained absence for any period exceeding three calendar months', the said Edward Hyde should step into the said Henry Jekyll shoes without any further delay. ...read more.

Conclusion

During the Victorian times, Darwin's theory of evolution had become public, and had shocked all, with his thoughts that humans were of descendants to apes and are in some way or another related to them, contradictorily to that of Adam and Eve. The fact that Stevenson used these verbs and adjectives to illustrate Hyde as an animal, would have shocked his original audience, reminding them of the fact that they're descendants of mere apes, thus creating a scary sensation, adding to the suspense and horror of the novel itself. Is Darwin's theory of evolution accurate, if so, as portrayed in the second chapter, in which ways does this mean we could act as mere animals ourselves? Stevenson uses different techniques to create a mood in which he feels is suitable to the scene, for example, setting, punctuation and vocabulary to set the scene, and character descriptions, in which adding to the suspense, horror or mystery of the scene. During the first two chapters of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, he uses a range of different methods to create a sense of suspense, horror, mystery. There are examples of these throughout the chapters, and the novel itself. Stevenson does this even more shockingly, with the human - animalistic characteristics throughout the book, which would of undoubtedly of been shocking at the time. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Robert Louis Stevenson section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Robert Louis Stevenson essays

  1. What impressions of Mr Hyde are created in the first two chapters of ‘Doctor ...

    The fact that we do not receive a description of Hyde's face at that moment shows that Stevenson wants the reader to be even more curious about this creature. The way also that Hyde disappears into the house through the door, shows that he can quickly leave awkward situations.

  2. Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde - How Does Stevenson create an atmosphere of tension ...

    The door was hiding something. On the fifth blow "the wreck of the door fell inwards on the carpet". As they looked in they notice the comfortable scene of the cabinet. Here there is a strong contrast between the cosy setting and the body of Hyde "sorely contorted and still twitching" on the floor.

  1. How does Stevenson create mystery and suspense in the opening 8 chapters of ;The ...

    This room is described as 'a large room' with a 'dingy windowless structure,' the surroundings setting the scene as mysterious and unusual, and reflecting his mood as he was 'looking deadly sick'. This creates mystery, particularly with the use of words such as 'dimly' and 'foggy' casting an uncertain haze

  2. how does Robert Louis Stevenson Create a sense of Mystery, Horror and Suspense ...

    This leads the audience to wonder, what would cause the walls to be discoloured and why does man take so little pride in his abode. The writer Robert Louse Stevenson uses words like the word sordid to create an image of evil and wickedness.

  1. How does Stevenson create intrigue in Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

    This chapter relieves the reader and answers nearly all theories and questions that the reader may have had. The surprising revelation that Dr Jekyll, a good, well mannered scientist, and Mr Hyde, an evil criminal, were in fact the same person with different motives in life.

  2. How does Stevenson create an atmosphere of suspense and horror in "Dr Jekyll and ...

    bring out beads of sweat on their foreheads, as he is so evil, and as Hyde was created he is also un-natural. Stevenson also describes how the door looks very unpleasant. He mentions that it looks blistered and distained and had neither bell nor knocker.

  1. How Does Stevenson Use Victorian Social Norms To Create Suspense In 'The Last Night' ...

    There could be suspense created because of this and because how Utterson will react to this is not known. Poole continues to disrespect and be rude towards Utterson when he is offered a glass of wine to calm his nerves, he does not drink it during the course of their

  2. How Stevenson uses his techniques as a writer to present character and atmosphere in ...

    This short conversation reveals right minded Victorians a decided manner and opinion that to prove something like a scientific demonstration of perhaps how humans were just like animals. They would think it absolute nonsense because they already had their mind set on what was right, what was wrong and how the world was created.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work