• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Stevenson develop and sustain mystery and tension in the strange case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr Hyde?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Stevenson develop and sustain mystery and tension in the strange case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr Hyde? Stevenson uses various amount of ways to develop and sustain mystery and tension in this novel. He starts this right away from the beginning, by introducing the reader to Mr Utterson and then Mr Enfield whilst taking a walk together. As these to friends are strolling along, Enfield tells Utterson which he describes a "very odd story." This story is what leads to the basis to the rest of the novel. The story is about a man walking down the street when a girl of eight or ten ran in to the man. Then the man trampled calmly over the girl's body and left her screaming on the ground. The girl's family and people come and are shouting at the man. But then the man took them to the place with the door. ...read more.

Middle

Now Utterson lets the reader know that he intends to solve the mystery by going to Dr Lanyon's house for some information on this issue. We are first introduced to Lanyon who is a friend of Utterson and Jekyll. But Lanyon has never heard of Hyde and has fallen out of communication with Jekyll as a result of a professional disagreement. He is the first character to mention Jekyll's experiments, which he describes them as "too fanciful for him". Another character is introduced to the reader, who is Poole, Jekyll's servant. This adds to the mystery because Poole tells Utterson that Jekyll hardly leaves his laboratory and cabinet and that all servants have been ordered by Jekyll to obey all of Hyde's commands. This makes the reader think what is Hyde doing to Jekyll to get all these things done for him even though Stevenson is hinting it is black mail. In the next chapter, the reader is finally introduced to Jekyll at one of his well-attended dinner parties. ...read more.

Conclusion

This chapter is about when Poole goes to Utterson to tell him to come quickly to Mr Jekyll's house. At this moment Poole is terrified. Stevenson does this so that the readers know that where there going, is where Poole is scared about. To make the reader any more tense Stevenson makes the journey dark and windy with deserted streets. Also when Utterson arrives with Poole, he finds the servants gathered fearfully in the main hall. The action continues as they now have to break into his cabinet (the room next to his laboratory) where they find Hyde dying. Stevenson does this at this point of the novel because it means the reader is very close to finding out the answer to the mystery. Another clue that Stevenson gives for the reader to find out the answer to the mystery is that Hyde is wearing clothes of Jekyll also which are too big for him. We know this because it says "He was dressed in clothes far too large for him, clothes of the doctor's bigness." ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Miscellaneous section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Miscellaneous essays

  1. In What Ways Does Robert Louis Stevenson Explore The Concept Of Duality In 'Dr ...

    The ego's purpose is to keep the 'id' under control. It is obvious that Robert Louis Stevenson used this theory in his novella. Hyde represents the 'id' whereas Jekyll represents the 'ego' because Hyde is an evil, animalistic character while Jekyll is a good, civilised character.

  2. Adrian Mole Chapter Notes

    He said he was sorry about the previous day and said that his parents are going through a tough time. His father paid him back for the chips from the previous day. February 9th There was a removal truck outside Mr Lucas house, Mrs Lucas is moving out.

  1. Human Nature Within The Text of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

    Utterson about another horrible character called Mr. Hyde. Mr. Hyde badly hurt a young girl and that was the first evil the reader hears. Mr. Utterson went home to find a character called Dr. Jekyll's will who mentioned Mr. Hyde. This is the first time Dr. Jekyll was mentioned.

  2. The Portrayal of mans duel nature in The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and ...

    Duality can also be seen in the portrayal of the murder of Danvers Carew, who we know to be an MP "shocking murder of an MP" and from the impact his death has we can assume him to be well liked and respected.

  1. Jekyll and Hyde

    His use of the metaphor, like a fire in a wood, means that the feeling is contagious like fire, and when you go there, you feel upbeat yourself. It then greatly differs to the description of the door, which makes you think of a rotting animal with words such as 'thrust forward' 'blistered and stained'.

  2. Explore the representation of Evil in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

    Middle-class men would have been expected to conceal their secret desires, and if they wanted to express them, they would have to do so in darker parts of the city. This can explain Dr. Jekyll's desire to transform himself into Hyde, as it would give him a way to release some of his desires and not be discovered doing it.

  1. one girl one dream

    So the choice is yours." It wasn't much of a choice so I just did what I had to and agreed to go. "I will go but Oscar must be able to fly over with me!" "I'm sorry but it is illegal for wild animals like Oscar to fly over

  2. The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

    However Stevenson was writing before Freud and before modern psychology. He does not, therefore, use the words of Freudian psychology, yet repression, sublimation and denial all feature. " The unconscious is the true psychical reality; in its innermost nature it is a much unknown to us as the reality of

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work