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How does Stevenson develop and sustain mystery and tension in the strange case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr Hyde?

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Introduction

How does Stevenson develop and sustain mystery and tension in the strange case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr Hyde? Stevenson uses various amount of ways to develop and sustain mystery and tension in this novel. He starts this right away from the beginning, by introducing the reader to Mr Utterson and then Mr Enfield whilst taking a walk together. As these to friends are strolling along, Enfield tells Utterson which he describes a "very odd story." This story is what leads to the basis to the rest of the novel. The story is about a man walking down the street when a girl of eight or ten ran in to the man. Then the man trampled calmly over the girl's body and left her screaming on the ground. The girl's family and people come and are shouting at the man. But then the man took them to the place with the door. ...read more.

Middle

Now Utterson lets the reader know that he intends to solve the mystery by going to Dr Lanyon's house for some information on this issue. We are first introduced to Lanyon who is a friend of Utterson and Jekyll. But Lanyon has never heard of Hyde and has fallen out of communication with Jekyll as a result of a professional disagreement. He is the first character to mention Jekyll's experiments, which he describes them as "too fanciful for him". Another character is introduced to the reader, who is Poole, Jekyll's servant. This adds to the mystery because Poole tells Utterson that Jekyll hardly leaves his laboratory and cabinet and that all servants have been ordered by Jekyll to obey all of Hyde's commands. This makes the reader think what is Hyde doing to Jekyll to get all these things done for him even though Stevenson is hinting it is black mail. In the next chapter, the reader is finally introduced to Jekyll at one of his well-attended dinner parties. ...read more.

Conclusion

This chapter is about when Poole goes to Utterson to tell him to come quickly to Mr Jekyll's house. At this moment Poole is terrified. Stevenson does this so that the readers know that where there going, is where Poole is scared about. To make the reader any more tense Stevenson makes the journey dark and windy with deserted streets. Also when Utterson arrives with Poole, he finds the servants gathered fearfully in the main hall. The action continues as they now have to break into his cabinet (the room next to his laboratory) where they find Hyde dying. Stevenson does this at this point of the novel because it means the reader is very close to finding out the answer to the mystery. Another clue that Stevenson gives for the reader to find out the answer to the mystery is that Hyde is wearing clothes of Jekyll also which are too big for him. We know this because it says "He was dressed in clothes far too large for him, clothes of the doctor's bigness." ...read more.

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