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How does the book relate to the title 'Much Ado About Nothing'.

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Introduction

How does the book relate to the title 'Much Ado About Nothing' The play has comedy, romance, suspense, action and a lot of drama twisted into several hundred lines of verse. In the end, however, everyone is happy and not a lot changes. Thus, Shakespeare shows the reader that although the play is enjoyable and witty, it really is not a very important piece of literature because of its subject matter. The play is important because it shows us that life itself is similarly enjoyable and foolish - our lives are "much ado about nothing." Undeniably, the play is about nothing; it merely follows the relationships of Claudio and Hero, and in the end, the play concludes in the two other main characters falling in love, which, because it was an event that was quite predictable, proves to be much ado about nothing. ...read more.

Middle

The middle section of the play centers on the false assumptions of Benedick and Beatrice, as well as the lies told to Claudio about Hero's supposed death. Considering that the saga is thus based around lies and assumptions, which both amount to nothing in terms of the truth, we can conclude that the drama is indeed about nothing. Not even Don John manages to remove the nothingness from the play: he purposely invokes lies about Hero and Don Pedro, which eventually amount to nothing when Hero and Claudio are united. In fact, the irony is that Don John's evil produces good in the end, because it provokes the crisis of the play, and results in a strengthening of love. The idea of noting is also continued throughout the play, and is particularly shown by the changing relationship between Beatrice and Benedick. ...read more.

Conclusion

By considering these three different aspects of the word 'nothing' in the title of "Much Ado," it is possible to say that indeed the title is suited to the events of the play. The main action (i.e.: Claudio and Hero) concerns nothing, because Don John's trick is a lie, as is Hero's apparent death; and yet Claudio creates much ado over both situations. In addition, Benedick and Beatrice spend much of the play observing, or noting, the actions, words and behavior of each other (and also of Don Pedro, Claudio, Leonato and Hero, who set up a trick to try to unite them), and music plays an important role in this. Considering the close link between the three meanings of the word 'nothing', particularly in the late 16th Century, I think that the title is an excellent description of the main events of the play. ...read more.

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