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How does the character of Romeo change in the first three acts of the play?

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Introduction

Manon Mollard MP5a 05.11.04 English: Romeo & Juliet How does the character of Romeo change in the first three acts of the play? Romeo Montague is a character who evolves considerably through the Shakespearian play "Romeo & Juliet", from his unrequited love with Rosaline to his banishment, including his strong love for Juliet and his reaction about Mercutio's death. When we first meet Romeo in the scene one of Act I, he expresses his sadness because he is in love, but Rosaline, the girl he likes, doesn't return his love: "out of her favour where I am in love". The oxymorons he uses, "Why then, o brawling love, o loving hate, [...] cold fire, sick health", show us that he is very confused by emotions, both love and hate; love because of Rosaline, and hate because of the fued between his family, the Montagues, and the Capulets. When he talks about Rosaline, we can see he is very romantic: "love is a smoke made with the fume of sights [...] and a preserving ...read more.

Middle

Romeo is devastated: "Oh dear account, my life is my foe's debt" Since then, we can realise that Romeo's love for Juliet is sincere. This is showed once again when Romeo enters the Capulet's orchard to go to Juliet's balcony because he says: "With love's light wings [...] thy kinsmen are not to stop me"; Romeo is pretty brave because he could be killed if a Capulet sees him, and a little foolhardy as well I guess because he doesn't really realize that, he just thinks about being with his love. I think this love is stronger than the love Romeo felt for Rosaline because Juliet really loves him back. And we are sure that the feelings Romeo has for Juliet are sincere because he expresses them in a soliloquy: "He jests at scars [...] cast it off". During this entire scene, Romeo declares his love to the young girl: "Ah Juliet [...] by this dear encounter"; and even promises her he will arrange a marriage "Save what [...] by holy marriage". ...read more.

Conclusion

He even says he could kill himself, only because he is a Montague: "he offers to stab himself". At the end of this scene, Romeo is feeling a little bit better because Friar Lawrence promises he'll try to solve things out, and makes Romeo see the positive side of the situation: Juliet is still alive and Tybalt could have killed him. After spending the whole night with Juliet, Romeo has to leave for Mantua. Even though he would prefer to stay with his love, he changes his mind about death being worse than banishment because Juliet tells him to go and the Friar has given him positive thoughts to take with him to Mantua. So we have seen the evolution of the character of Romeo throughout the first three acts of the play and we can conclude that at the beginning Romeo is a young fickle and immature gentleman, and he turns out to become a married man banished from Verona, but who gains in maturity and has a crime on his conscience. ...read more.

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