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HOW DOES THE POET CREATE A SENSE OF PLACE? Composed Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth & London by William Blake

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Introduction

HOW DOES THE POET CREATE A SENSE OF PLACE? Composed Upon Westminster Bridge by William Wordsworth & London by William Blake Composed Upon Westminster Bridge:- William Wordsworth managed to write this poem by using his sister's diary, written after she went to London. As she was a tourist, she only saw the wonders of London rather than the depressing, backstreets where the working class lived. This poem is a sonnet describing how London is so beautiful and should be read at a slow and calm pace. Wordsworth uses different techniques to describe London which creates such effective imagery that readers can actually picture themselves on that very bridge. ...read more.

Middle

In the first stanza, he says how every street is planned; the River Thames has to flow in a certain direction because of the banks blocking it and how the people look weak and unhappy. He uses long vowel sounds 'I wander thro' each charter'd street' and punctuation to create the pace that the poem should be read at. This also gives a pace of how fast or slow he is walking. He also uses repetition in the first two lines 'charter'd' and alliteration 'marks of weakness, marks of woe' to make it more effective and to describe how it was and how people were. ...read more.

Conclusion

There is also a half pun on the word 'appalls' - you can hear it as St.Paul's. It then leads on to working class going to war and coming home badly injured and no one tries to help them, not even the rich (i.e. royalty), so they are just left to die 'the hapless Soldier's sigh runs in blood down palace walls'. In the last stanza, it again uses sound sensitivity of how during midnight you can hear a young prostitute's baby cry which is said to be a 'curse' and also is a symbol of working class women 'the youthful Harlot's curse blasts the new born infant's tear'. The last line basically explains that if no one helps- you might as well die because there is no future. ?? ?? ?? ?? Sarah Deller 10FF ...read more.

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