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How does the soliloquy illustrate Macbeth's personal conflict?

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Introduction

How does the soliloquy illustrate Macbeth's personal conflict? Macbeth met three witches who told him that he would be the Thane of Cawdor and the King hereafter. When he had been given the title Thane of Cawdor, he was amazed and started to believe he would become king. He sent a letter to inform his wife about it and when King Duncan decided to stay over at Macbeth's castle for a night, his wife treated it as an opportunity to kill the King and seize the throne and revealed her plan to Macbeth. Macbeth's mind was in a state of confusion of whether to murder the king and speaks his soliloquy. ...read more.

Middle

In short, he is afraid of retribution which serves as one of the price he has to risk paying for the murder of the king as once he usurps the throne there will be others who will plot to steal it from him. This soliloquy illustrates Macbeth's personal conflict by showing his guilt for wanting to kill the king. This can be seen from " He's here in double trust" and "this Duncan hath borne his faculties so meek". This shows that Macbeth feels that as a relative and host of Duncan, he should protect him and not attempt to kill him. He knows that he will be forever plagued with guilt after killing the King who is related to him in either way, by blood or as a guest. ...read more.

Conclusion

As a result, Macbeth will be guilty for the upsetting of the natural balance and divine order of the world by killing the rightful king. This soliloquy illustrates Macbeth's personal conflict by showing his "Vaulting ambition". He is aware that what kindled his own innermost desire to obtain the throne is his ambition and it is what that drives him on. However, "Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself and falls on the other" shows that he is clear that ambition often brings about one's downfall. All in all, this soliloquy shows Macbeth's conflicting feelings about whether to kill the king. He wrestles with his conscious and struggles between his morality and ambition. If he chooses ambition, he will have to pay the price that may ensue. However, if he choose his morality, he will not be able to fulfill his desires. ...read more.

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