• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Wilde Create Comedy in this Scene of "The Importance of Being Earnest"?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Re-read from page 290, line 691 ‘GWENDOLEN: You have filled my tea…’ to page 291, line 745 ‘GWENDOLEN: You will call me sister, will you not?’ How does Wilde create comedy in this scene? The Importance of Being Earnest is considered by many to be a comedy of manners, focusing on the love lives of aristocratic young people, and relying on the use of verbal wit, stock characters and humour over developing a deep plot and sense of character. In this scene, Gwendolen and Cecily have just gotten into a fight over their alleged fiancés mistaken identity. Through his use of hyperbolic language, dramatic stage directions, character role and theme, Wilde creates a comic scene. Wilde use dramatic stage directions to create humour in this scene. For example: “CECILY: (very sweetly)” and “GWENDOLEN: (slowly and seriously)”. ...read more.

Middle

This façade is continued when Gwendolen replies “slowly and seriously” and asks Cecily if she will call her a sister. Again, the juxtaposition between the two adversaries moments before, to ‘sisters’ creates a dramatic and humorous twist in the plot of this scene. Wilde utilises hyperbolic language to create drama and comedy in this scene. For instance, when Gwendolen says, “My poor wounded Cecily!” to which Cecily replies “My sweet wronged Gwendolen”. Like the use of stage directions, there is an immediate juxtaposition from the earlier spar that the two had with each other – the two had no definitive reason to suddenly describe each other as “wounded” and “sweet” after Gwendolen had voiced her distrust only moments beforehand. ...read more.

Conclusion

Not only does this reinforce the notion of a comedy of manners as it does not develop a deep plot, but establishes a setting for which verbal sparring and wit play over the expansion of a storyline. Jack and Algernon are forced to reveal the truth about themselves and drop the façade that they had spent most of the time up to that point building up, creating a comic instance, perhaps drawing some pathos from a shallow situation. In conclusion, through his use of hyperbolic language, dramatic stage directions and thematic issues, Wilde creates comedy in this scene. However, perhaps his use of character roles helps most to create this atmosphere: with everyone adopting a façade, and at almost the same time, everyone dropping them (or arguably creating another one) in order to please other characters, a humorous scene appears out the seemingly chaotic nature of the characters. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Oscar Wilde section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Oscar Wilde essays

  1. The Importance of Being Earnest-" A trivial comedy for serious people".

    Pg 326. Wilde mocks how confused Victorian values of honesty and responsibility were, due to the fact that they were constantly alternating between truths, lies and earnestness, by using their alter egos whenever it was convenient for them. The most important parody in the play is of the desires revolving around marriage.

  2. The characters in the play are paired. Compare and contrast Jack and Algernon,

    Her tone of language is always earnest and serious. She seems to be the only really adult persons in this play. She speaks in commands, judgements and pronouncements, imposing rules and authority. So much she says is so absurd, hypocritical and self-contradictory that the reader simply has to laugh at her like the other persons in the play do.

  1. Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

    He opens it and reads of the way he treated Dorian whilst they were in a deep relationship. Dorian had every intention of blackmailing this man if he did not dispose of the body. This shows that corruption and private affairs in Dorian Grays society are kept very quiet at all times.

  2. What makes the play ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’ funny?

    A man must have an occupation of some kind. There are too many idle men in London as it is." The comment implies that men are useless and the notion that smoking counts as participation in an activity is quite funny because smoking requires no effort what so ever.

  1. Explore Oscar Wildes presentation of his character Jack from his play The Importance of ...

    two lives, one in the town and one in the country and as no-body likes to be lied to, Algernon and Jack would probably wend up having a fight, and things would probably have to change or Algernon would want to meet Cecily and everything would get confusing, so Jack didn't want him to find out.

  2. Humorous in The Importance of Being Earnest

    Although the audience knows what is happening, the characters in the play are unaware of the truth. Oscar Wilde creates humour out of dramatic irony because it is funny to the audience that they know outcome instead of the characters.

  1. oscar wilde

    and now realises the sorrow of people and wants to help them. He is ashamed of all of those high standard social rich people in the society who do nothing but dominate the poor people and makes the situation worst.

  2. The Importance of Being Earnest

    However, only Jack uses his education scrupulously, and he has a job and lots of money. Algernon meanwhile feels no need to have a occupation, he lives solely off of his birthright. To be fashionable is Algernon's most important concern and therefore he is forever buying new clothes.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work