• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How effective are the closing scenes (from the entrance of Hale) in resolving the conflict presented in Arthur Miller's

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How effective are the closing scenes (from the entrance of Hale) in resolving the conflict presented in Arthur Miller's "The Crucible" Arthur Miller was born in 1915 and was only fourteen years of age at the time of the Wall Street crash, this clearly affected his life. His plays often concentrated upon contemporary society and problems it may face. This is why at first sight "The Crucible" seems to break this mould, instead of a play showing contemporary society; it concerns a study in the mass hysteria which led to the 1692 Salem witchcraft trials. The play is based around the Salem Witchcraft trials of the 17th century; however the play is in fact a comment on the mass hysteria which swept America in the 1950's concerning the huge fear, communism. Communism threatened America's capitalist attitude to life, and especially "The American Dream". The "dream" if anyone worked hard they could find great wealth and prosper. Rich and upper class American citizens feared the far left extremists, because the thought of a communist state being established horrified them. This could cause their hard earned wealth being shared evenly among the population. Arthur Miller's "The Crucible" shows a parallel between the America of the 1950's and the Salem Witch trials in 1692. ...read more.

Middle

The central conflict in the play arises from one of Miller's recurrent themes- what an individual does in his life affects the whole society. This refers to Proctor's adultery and the catastrophic events that result but also his decision at the end of the play. Coming after the high drama of the court scene at the end of Act 3, Act 4 begins in a subdued, muted way. It is set in a cell where Tituba and Sarah Good are talking before Herrick attempts to move them. The opening of the Act is a contrast to the hysterical ending of Act 3 where there were more accusations of witchcraft, more screaming and shouting. The subdued beginning of Act 4 is needed as Miller knows by compiling too much tension it would become comical. Miller uses the juxtaposition of the high drama of Act 3 to the subdued but comic beginning to Act 4. The comedy at the beginning of Act 4 is of great importance as it alleviates the tension. Miller injects some comedy into the opening of the act when Tituba and Sarah Good believe the noise of a bellowing cow is the devil. If I were a director of this scene I would have the "mooing" of a cow made from off stage, and then have Tituba claim it to be the devil. ...read more.

Conclusion

The actions of Act 1 and 2 may have seemed private at the time but by the time the play reaches Act 3 these private actions begin to have public consequences. This displays that an individual cannot act alone and that one's actions not only affect oneself but also the rest of society. The entrance of Hale in Act 1 shows him to be a powerful man. He is the man who will rid Salem of the devil; he will save the already broken community. Not only is Salem supposedly harbouring the devil, before this there were squabbles over land, jealousy and vengeance. Hale is seen by the Salem community as a saviour. Nicholas Hytner's film production conveys an image that Hale is a hero, the whole population of Salem come to greet his entrance. Hytner also shows Hale to be very committed to his work, and upon his arrival it seems he is in a rush to begin his work, by rushing to see the inert Betty. I feel Hytner's way of introducing Hale is effective, because as an audience one can see how Hail and his books were seen by the Salem community to be the answers to all their problems. Hale is believed to be an expert on witchcraft. He was initially summoned by Parris to determine whether the devil was in Salem. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Arthur Miller section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Arthur Miller essays

  1. Focusing on Act 3, to what extent is 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller an ...

    and Danforth replies 'you send your spirit out?' The attacks show that she was put under a lot of pier pressure to side with the girls and by doing this it lead to Mary changing her decision. The third way slow tension is built up through out the scene is by Proctor's confession and the dramatic irony of Elizabeth's 'natural lie.'

  2. There is a clear parallel between the events of 1692 in Salem and the ...

    Thus proving that the terror and accusations were so large, large powers were accused. In McCarthyism well-respected writers and filmmakers were accused of communist acts. This proves that in both trials people were starting to accuse bigger names and more important people and people believed that these bigger names were

  1. How has Arthur Miller presented the American Dream Theme in 'A View From the ...

    In the first act, Marco stays extremely quiet and only says vital or necessary things. He doesn't want to offend or annoy anyone and he is only in America to earn money for his wife. His American Dream is that he can work hard, and be rewarded by having his sons fed instead of starving.

  2. Examine how Arthur Miller uses the character of Rev. Hale in 'The Crucible'

    Hale's enlightenment to this catastrophe is due to John Proctor. Proctor's indestructible pride and immense courage allow Hale to finally try and end this deadly act of name-calling. "Let you not mistake your duty as I mistook my own... and what I touched with bright confidence, it died..." (Miller 132)

  1. Show how Miller delivers tension and conflict during the opening scene of The Crucible.

    However, Elizabeth's responses are laconic, "Aye.", "That's well." and "Aye, it would." which suggests that Elizabeth does not want to talk to John. This could be because Elizabeth is still hurt because of the relations between John and Abigail or because Elizabeth's mind is elsewhere because of all the accusations of witchcraft circulating through out Salem at this time.

  2. Saving Private Ryan

    deep silence which is then cut by Millers voice as he bellows instructions towards the soldiers. The subconscious whistle indicates the beginning of the killing spree as the consequential instant overwhelming chaos, as within seconds men begin to drop in rows one by one in front of our eyes.

  1. How effective are the closing scenes in the play at resolving the conflict presented ...

    As what happens in Act 1 with Betty and Abigail shouting out names (page 39-40) happens in a private room but the aftermath involves the whole community. Also in Act 2 when Elizabeth is summoned by the courts, she is summoned by the courts in a private place, her home,

  2. The Crucible - Act 1 by Arthur Miller ...

    Without proof or evidence the inciting of fear and suspicion would lead in the 1950's to the eventual break up of families and friendship as people accused each other of disloyal acts against America, which links in with The Crucible.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work